Design

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Nearly every photo online has been edited in some way, whether through cropping, filtering, compressing, colour-correcting or other generally innocuous touch-ups. But a lot of people attempt to pass off doctored images as true ones, leading to hoaxes, crackpot theories, and more than one trip to Snopes for some fact-checking. You can do the world a service by helping those around you identify real photos from fake ones. Here's how.

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Didn't you think Mark Zuckerberg is tall? According to a 2010 New Yorker profile, he's "only around five feet eight, but he seems taller, because he stands with his chest out and his back straight, as if held up by a string." Wired writer Graham Starr thinks Zuck seems tall for another reason: He stages his photos to exaggerate his height.

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Ready to make the jump from crayons to Photoshop? No need to panic -- the internet is packed with resources to guide you through your first steps in the world of professional image and photo editing. TastyTuts' comprehensive 33-video tutorial is as good as it gets and comes complete with extensive course notes and other useful content.

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There are many ways to take a good photograph: positioning and lighting, compelling subject matter and decent equipment can all play a role. However, it's also possible to boost the quality of your photos via a few simple tricks. With that in mind, here are 21 camera hacks from the Lifehacker archives - from candid photography tips to cheap DIY accessories.

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Reader Saifali has submitted desktops in the past to our Desktop Showcase, but this one's a fresh look, and we like it. If you dig it too -- or just the Antarctic landscape in it -- here's how you can bring the same look to your computer.

Shared from Kotaku

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ASUS got in touch with me the other week and said, "Hey, would you like to see our new monitor?" And I thought, sure. Monitors are cool. Tech is cool.

But this isn't a monitor. It's more like a TV.

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iOS: Apple's default camera app is a multifaceted photo capture tool, and simple enough to use. From panoramas to videos to HDR pictures, you can capture a variety of images, but can't reach that granularity you might want if you're trying to frame that perfect shot. Photographers looking for more control should check out Halide ($7.99), a great app for dedicated photographers who want controls at their fingertips, or amateurs who want to play with the principles of the medium.

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Terrariums are having their biggest moment since Queen Victoria was in power. A popular way to exhibit plants in the late 1800s, terrariums, called "Wardian Cases" in the Victorian era, were elaborate affairs that could take up an entire side table. These days, the smaller, simpler iterations line the windows of trendy shops and office desks. Here's how to build your own for a fraction of the cost of those fancy kits.

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Mac: Some of the most popular apps on your phone most likely have a web-friendly version. Facebook and Twitter both started on the web, after all. But Instagram is different, and not exactly web-friendly, which makes it a hassle if you prefer to edit your photos on your desktop (large screens are still cool!) instead of your phone. There is an Instagram app for Windows 10 users, but Mac owners are out of luck.

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Android: If your phone's storage is running low, you might want to start deleting some low-quality photos from your phone or backing it up with an app like Google Photos. Luckily the photo app EyeEm announced an update on Wednesday that uses artificial intelligence to pick out your best photos.

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Over the past three weeks, the /r/ProgrammerHumor subreddit has reinvented the on-screen volume controller hundreds of times over. Starting with one user's sideways slider, users have created funny volume controls based on laptop screen angle, fidget spinners, battery power, latitude and longitude, and the digits of pi. I've gathered some highlights here. For maximum appreciation, imagine how each one sounds.

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The theory of a flat earth is wrong. To the point where even typing the words 'the theory of a flat earth is wrong' is giving the "theory" too much credit. But a confession: I find flat earth theory and the people who believe in it fascinating. I don't mean to patronise. It's just really interesting.

I also really, really love the drawings and paintings: the depictions of what a flat earth might look like from space, created by artists who are 100 per cent serious. Here are a few of my favourites.

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A 360-degree camera is one of those things that I didn't quite get the draw of until I actually tried one. A friend brought his new Gear 360 to a dinner party, snapped an epic shot of everyone at our table doing a cheers, and I was instantly hooked. A week later I was toting my own around, and I've carried the thing with me on every single holiday and remotely interesting event I've attended since.