How to Check if You’re Running Android’s Speedier 64-Bit Chrome

How to Check if You’re Running Android’s Speedier 64-Bit Chrome
Screenshot: David Murphy
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The recent release of Chrome 89 brought with it one super-useful upgrade for a number of Android users: an official 64-bit version of the browser, which Google claims is “up to 8.5% faster to load pages and 28% smoother when it comes to scrolling and input latency.”

Before you get too excited, however, know that there are a few hoops you’ll have to jump through in order to benefit from this beefier browser. First, you need to be running Chrome 89, so make sure you’ve taken a trip to the Google Play Store and updated your browser (and other apps, while you’re there).

Second, your device needs to be running Android 10, at minimum. If you’re not sure whether that’s the case, visit your Settings app’s System Update section (System > Advanced > System update on my particular Pixel) to see if you have any pending updates. To check the Android version that your device is running, visit your phone’s “About” section, likely within its Settings app, and look for something like this:

Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

Finally, your Android device will need to have at least 8GB of memory to be able to use the 64-bit Chrome browser. If you forgot how much yours has, look up its specs. You can also enable developer options (by tapping frantically on the “Build number” in the About section of your phone’s settings), and then go to System > Advanced > Developer options; you should see your phone’s memory listed there. (At least, that’s where I found it on my Pixel.)

Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

Or, if you’re lazy like me, you can simply launch Chrome on your Android and type chrome://version in the address bar.

Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

Alas, no 64-bit version for me — my Pixel 3a XL is finally showing its age. On my souped-up Galaxy Note 20 Ultra 5G, however, a different story is told:

Screenshot: David Murphy Screenshot: David Murphy

Delightful. Bring on the speed.

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