What the 2021 Lunar New Year Has in Store for You

What the 2021 Lunar New Year Has in Store for You
Traditional Chinese Lion Dancing and firecrackers during Chinese New Year celebrations/Getty
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Well, friends. As you may already be aware, a Lunar new year is just around the corner. The event, which is celebrated in East Asian countries like China and Singapore, recognises the arrival of the first new moon of the lunisolar calendar.

On February 12, 2021 we will officially enter into a new Lunar year. This marks the start of Chinese New Year, where we will step into the Year of the Ox.

What does that mean?

First of all, the Ox is one of 12 zodiac signs that appear in Chinese culture. Every year has a sign that is associated with different traits – just like the astrological sign attached to your birth month.

I, for one, was born in the Year of the Snake. Apparently, that makes me “deep and complex” which I suppose could be a good thing? I’m not sure.

Those born in the Year of the Ox are described by ChineseNewYear.net as “hard workers in the background, intelligent and reliable, but never demanding praise”.

How will the New Year impact 2021?

Readers Digest reports that 2021’s zodiac suggests it will be a year filled with hard work (great). Susan Levitt, a professional astrologer told the outlet that the Year of the Ox is connected to “…hard work, duty, discipline”.

But it’s not all bad (I hope).

Levitt continued, telling RD:

“In agricultural societies, oxen are reliable and strong work animals. They were responsible for the survival of humanity. So what was happening in this Rat year continues over into the Ox year to complete it, ground it, bring it to its resolution.”

In any case, we want 2021 to run as smoothly as possible, so let’s tread lightly, yeah? Maybe make note of these Chinese New Year taboos so we can ensure a drama-free year going forward.

This article has been updated since its original publication.

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