How to Humblebrag Without Sounding Full of Yourself

How to Humblebrag Without Sounding Full of Yourself

This article is sponsored by Australian Red Cross Lifeblood.

This year’s been tough for everyone and it’s time to do our part and give back to the community. Raising awareness about a good deed, however, can easily become a shameless brag, especially in today’s hyper-connected social media culture. Lucky for you, there are a few ways to avoid getting called out for being boastful and master the art of a graceful ‘humblebrag’.

What does humblebragging mean?

Comedian and writer Harris Wittels coined the term ‘humblebrag’ to call out celebrities on Twitter who complain and brag at the same time. As wisely put by Urban Dictionary, “It’s subtly letting others know about how fantastic your life is while undercutting it with a bit of self-effacing humour or ‘woe is me’ gloss.”

Even if you’re not famous, it takes very little for people to call you out if it seems like you’re stroking your ego with your latest good deed, whether it’s volunteering at a homeless shelter, distributing food and clothes to those in need or helping out with conservation efforts to protect the Great Barrier Reef.

Donating blood and raising awareness about it is no exception and unfortunately, we need more voices giving it just the right coverage. Australia is in need of 31,000 blood donations each week because one in three people need blood products in their lifetime but only one in 30 people donate. These stats need to change.

Here are ways to humblebrag about donating blood to promote a good cause or any other aspect of your life you’re proud of. You don’t need to shy away from your accomplishments, just ditch the false humility.

#1 Show rather than tell

Although it might be your personal ‘win’, the message will always be better received if you’re in a picture with other people sharing the spotlight.

For example, Australian Red Cross Lifeblood is promoting its cause through a new ‘True Colours‘ campaign where those donating blood will get a limited edition bandage designed by one of six Aussie artists. Instead of putting up a picture of yourself, get others in the picture and really let the bandage do the talking. After all, it truly is your permission to flex.

#2 Be gracious and give credit where it’s due

You’re more likely to draw a positive response if you have the right messaging. That means giving gratitude and being thankful. Mention the organisation involved, tag them, and show you’re grateful for having the opportunity to do something good during these tough times. After all, you don’t hear award-winners at the Oscars saying “it was all me, only me”.

#3 Build connections and support

Don’t let your humblebrag fall on deaf ears. People will appreciate your valiant efforts if you end up on their timeline and they recognise your name from previous exchanges.

Support and appreciate your friends and network connections — even your own work colleagues — and they’ll do the same for you when the time comes.

#4 Own your success

Yes, there is such a thing as being overly modest and it’s just as obnoxious sounding as if you were bragging. Don’t give your network an “I can’t believe I managed to pull this off when I thought I had very little talent” or “Can’t believe I donated blood and didn’t faint.”

Celebrate what you’ve done and let people know how you got there. Hard work and good deeds will get noticed if you’re honest and open.


For those of you who are eligble, flex your ‘True Colours’ and donate blood. Visit Lifeblood to check your eligibility and book your donation today. One in three Aussies will need blood products in their lifetime, but only one in thirty actually donate, so if you’ve been putting it off, now’s the time to roll up your sleeves and donate.

Get in quick because the limited-edition artist-designed arm bandages are only available until the end of November (and don’t forget to upload your post-donation pic!).

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