This Week’s Most Popular NBN Plans

This Week’s Most Popular NBN Plans
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Picking a new NBN plan can be confusing. Do you go with a trusted name or do you pick a smaller provider? What speed do you need? New providers pop up all the time, and it can feel like plans change on a daily basis. There’s a lot to consider.

If you just want a simple answer, it can pay to follow the crowd and get an idea of what everyone else is buying. With that in mind, here are this week’s top five NBN plans according to around a million WhistleOut users.

The five plans below aren’t the cheapest, but they’re the plans most WhistleOut users are interested in, based on the last seven days of activity. Given WhistleOut tracks hundreds of plans from over 30 providers, hitting the top of the charts certainly isn’t easy.

Here are the current champions:

Tangerine Unlimited NBN 50

As one of the cheapest NBN 50 plans around, it’s no surprise that Tangerine takes out the top spot when it comes to the most popular NBN plans right now. You’ll pay $59.90 per month for your first six months, and then $69.90 per month thereafter.

Tangerine’s plans are contract-free so you can always leave when the discount runs out, and the plan also includes a 14-day risk-free period. If you’re not happy with the plan, you can leave within your first fortnight and get a full refund of plan fees. Tangerine won’t refund any modem purchases, but the telco’s modems are unlocked and can be used with other providers.

Tangerine reports typical evening speeds of 42Mbps on NBN 50 plans.

Belong Unlimited NBN Starter

Telstra’s budget brand takes second plan for the week with its “NBN Starter” plan. While the plan is technically an NBN 50 plan, its speeds are capped at 30Mbps in exchange for a lower monthly fee of $55. That’s 20Mbps slower than what’s technically possible on an NBN 50 plan.

30Mbps is however faster than what you’d get on an NBN 25 plan, so this Belong plan isn’t a bad option if you’re not an overly demanding internet user.

You’ll need to sign a 12-month contract for this plan, but you’ll get a modem included with it. Belong will also throw in $80 of credit for its SIM-only mobile plans.

Telstra Unlimited NBN 100

Telstra is far from cheap, but it’s nonetheless Australia’s largest NBN provider. Coming in third is the telco’s NBN 100 plan, billed at $110 per month. While that’s certainly pricy, there are a few bonuses that help soften the blow. You’ll save $20 per month on your first three months, you’ll get three months of free access to Binge, and Telstra is currently waiving its $99 connection fee.

The plan is contract-free, but if you cancel within your first 24 months, you’ll need to pay out the remaining value of your modem. This is equivalent to $9 multiplied by the number of months left in the two-year term. The included modem has 4G backup in the event of an NBN outage.

This plan is only available to FTTP and HFC customers, however.

Telstra reports typical evening speeds of 88Mbps on its NBN 100 plans.

Tangerine Unlimited NBN 25

Tangerine makes a return in fourth place with its slightly cheaper NBN 25 plan. Once again, your first six months are discounted. You’ll pay $49.90 per month for your half a year with the telco, and $59.90 per month thereafter.

But as with Tangerine’s NBN 50 plan, its NBN 25 plan is contract-free and has a 14-day risk-free trial.

Tangerine reports typical evening speeds of 21Mbps on NBN 25 plans.

Internode Unlimited NBN 50

Internode has its own promotional discount, slinging an unlimited NBN 50 plan for $59.99 per month for your first six months. You’ll pay $79.99 per month thereafter, which is somewhat of a steeper jump than on Tangerine’s plans.

You’ll need to sign a six-month contract to get this Internode plan, but you’re still able to leave as soon as your discount expires.

Internode reports typical evening speeds of 42.8Mbps on NBN 50 plans.

 

Alex Choros is Managing Editor at WhistleOut, Australia’s phone and internet comparison website.


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