Microsoft's Edge Browser Just Became A Dark Horse

Long has Microsoft Edge - and it's discontinued sibling Internet Explorer - been the bane of the internet browsing world. But a new version might just give it the edge it's always needed and it's using Google to make it happen.

Microsoft's new browser, Microsoft Edge Chromium, is set to be based on Google's open-source web browser, Chromium. That means we're essentially getting a Microsoft-enhanced Chrome due to be released on 15 January 2020.

Beta screenshots do indicate it will definitely still have that Edge or Internet Explorer feel but hopefully not its usability.

Image: Microsoft

The company also announced on 16 December it's opening up submissions for developers to introduce their extensions to Microsoft Edge Chromium extensions.

"In most cases, existing extensions built for Chromium will work without any modifications in the new Microsoft Edge," Microsoft's announcement read.

"We recommend that developers update your existing EdgeHTML extensions for Chromium and publish them via the new portal as soon as possible, so your existing customers will not face any interruptions when they update to the new Microsoft Edge."

If you can't wait until 15 January to try it out for yourself, you can give the beta a whirl by heading to the Microsoft Edge Insider page and hitting that Download Beta Channel for Windows 10 button.

Hopefully, it all means Microsoft Edge might finally move into the realm of the Firefoxes and Chromes. Alternatively, you can just rid of the damn thing and keep using Chrome or Firefox.

How To Keep Microsoft From Installing Edge (Chromium) On Your PC

Microsoft plans to roll out Edge via a Windows Update on January 15. We’ve had a great time playing around with it since the Chromium version of the browser debuted in April, and we’ll probably have even more to say before its official release next month. But it’s also OK to not want another browser on your desktop or laptop—unfortunately, you don’t get much of a choice in the matter.

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Comments

    What's so special about it? Why should anyone be interested in using it?

    I'm liking the new version of Edge web browser. I mainly use it for work and with the added AD integration you can download to your network, it actually works a lot better than Google's Chrome itself but you would expect that from Microsoft.

    This is all from a Network Admin's point of view for work though and not home use.

    Sorry Microsoft, this isn't going to stop me using Firefox.

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