Apple Just Banned Vaping Apps On iOS

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In accordance with new App Store guidelines, Apple removed 181 vape-related apps from the platform and is outright banning the inclusion of any vape-related apps or features in its app marketplace. It might seem like a sudden move on the company’s part, but Apple has been slowly moving towards this inevitable ban for months now—and it’s easy to see why.

Vaping is often portrayed by the vape industry as being healthier and safer than smoking cigarettes, but the government and private organisations have been advocating against the use of vape products almost as passionately as they do against smoking, and with good reason. The US Government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that vaping has resulted in at least 2,172 cases of respiratory illness/injury (including internal burns), and at least 42 recent deaths were caused by nicotine vape products. It’s certainly not as high as smoking-related deaths and illness, but those numbers will only grow as more research is done and vaping’s popularity increases.

Many companies have responded to these figures by removing or banning the sale or advertising of vape-related products, hence Apple’s decision to pull all vaping apps from the App Store. While axing all the apps in one fell swoop was sudden, it wasn’t exactly surprising; Apple stopped accepting submissions for vape-related apps back in June and this formal ban is the last step in implementing its anti-vape policies.

If like me, you were unaware that vaping apps were even a thing in the first place then this probably doesn’t mean much to you, but those who relied on an iOS app to control or monitor their vaping devices will need to find a new platform. The Google Play store still has plenty of vape apps listed—some of which were also available on the Apple App Store—but these are Android app marketplaces and won’t work on Apple Products. At this point, unless you want to jailbreak an iOS device so you can run non-App Store apps, your choices are to jump to Android or, change your vape, or, y’know, stop vaping.

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Comments

    The deaths were not from vaping nicotine.

    They were from Vitamin E Acetate in black market THC carts.

    That is what it literally says in the CDC page you link to in the article.

    "CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI). Recent CDC laboratory testing of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples (fluid samples collected from the lungs) from 29 patients with EVALI submitted to CDC from 10 states found vitamin E acetate in all of the samples. Vitamin E acetate might be used as an additive, most notably as a thickening agent in THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

    CDC recommends that people should not use e-cigarette, or vaping, products that contain THC, particularly from informal sources like friends, or family, or in-person or online dealers. Until the relationship of vitamin E acetate and lung health is better understood, vitamin E acetate should not be added to e-cigarette, or vaping, products. In addition, people should not add any substance to e-cigarette or vaping products that are not intended by the manufacturer, including products purchased through retail establishments. CDC will continue to update guidance, as appropriate, as new data become available from this outbreak investigation."

    at least 42 recent deaths were caused by nicotine vape products

    Yeah, but they weren't.

    Please do not mis-report on a topic already confusing to non-vapers.
    On November 8, the The CDC reported a "breakthrough" that ALL of their tests confirm that the patients had THC in their system and that the harmful agent they found was Vitamin E Acetate.

    Vitamin E Acetate in the form of "Honey Cut" was the most popular THC thickening agent that allowed people who added it to disguise that they had cut THC oil, thus being able to "water down" their product by 80%.

    Vitamin E Acetate has NOT been found in any nicotine vaping products and there is no economic incentive to include it in any because it is more expensive than the base products used in nicotine e-juice.

    You are conflating two issues.

    "at least 42 recent deaths were caused by nicotine vape products"

    Might want to go re-read that. 42 deaths, not 42 nicotine deaths. The likely culprit, as the CDC finally admits is Vitamin E Acetate, something used in cannabis cartridges but not in nicotine vaping.

    Incorrect. Those 42 deaths reported by the CDC involved cannabis vapes containing vitamin E acetate. No nicotine vape containers VEA.

    The problem with vaping is that young people are picking it up in really high numbers. I still think it's better than smoking but I can see why governments are freaking out about it.

    From the CDC report you cited above:

    "CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI). Recent CDC laboratory testing of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples (fluid samples collected from the lungs) from 29 patients with EVALI submitted to CDC from 10 states found vitamin E acetate in all of the samples. Vitamin E acetate might be used as an additive, most notably as a thickening agent in THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products.

    CDC recommends that people should not use e-cigarette, or vaping, products that contain THC, particularly from informal sources like friends, or family, or in-person or online dealers. Until the relationship of vitamin E acetate and lung health is better understood, vitamin E acetate should not be added to e-cigarette, or vaping, products. In addition, people should not add any substance to e-cigarette or vaping products that are not intended by the manufacturer, including products purchased through retail establishments. CDC will continue to update guidance, as appropriate, as new data become available from this outbreak investigation."

    Most if not all cases of illness and death have been attributed to the additive mentioned above - that was found in Illegal THC cartridges, purchased on the street - not caused by "nicotine vape products".
    Don't believe me - take a look - https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=vitamin+E+acetate
    Maybe next time read the material you include in your scare pieces before throwing more logs on the fire of hysteria.

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