Today I Discovered That A Human Year Isn't Actually Seven Dog Years

Image: Getty

Do you know your dog's age in 'dog years'? You know: supposedly a dog is seven dog years old on its first birthday and all that? Well, as it turns out, that figure isn't really accurate at all, and it's thrown even further out of whack when you realise that all dog breeds age at different rates. So if you want to figure out your pooch's actual age in dog years, here's how to do it.

It's fundamentally hard to find an equivalent between dog years and human years as our life cycles and biology differ considerably. Dogs reach sexual maturity at around one year old, for example, so already the 7 year equivalence doesn't make sense, but even if you move that up to 13 or 14, it still doesn't quite fit the model.

Compared to humans, dogs age quicker in the start of their life, and then slower towards the end of their life, so it takes some more complex maths to figure out a conversion from human years to dog years.

If you can't be bothered to figure it out yourself, here's a chart from Business Insider that'll help you figure out exactly how old your dog actually is. And yes - the higher numbers at the bottom of the table really drive home the difference in lifespan between small dogs and large ones.

Small dogs are classified as 9.5kg or less, medium are 9.6kg-22kg, large are 23kg-40kg and giant dogs are over 41kg.

Image: Business Insider

Interestingly enough, 'dog years' have been a concept for far longer than you'd think, with a text from 1268 saying that a human year was roughly equal to nine dog years. A different figure, but turns out they were still wrong about it back then, too.

So your one year old dog? Actually a naughty teenager. Have fun with that!

Now that you know your dog's real age, you might have to stockpile a few extra candles for the next doggy birthday you celebrate.

Today I Discovered is a daily dose of facts for Lifehacker readers - the weird, wonderful and sometimes worrying. Most of the time, it's just mind-blowing. Let us know if you discovered anything that blew your mind in the comments!


Comments

    Vets never use this dogs year rubbish, and for a reason, it's just too confusing and inaccurate.
    just use normal years, and know the life expectancy of your dog according to it's breed.
    even better, don't get a designer breed, as most mutts will outlive a fancy/expensive breed.

    I'd imagine the whole dogs years was a simple equation someone came up with based on a small number of animals, quite probably a single or small group of breeds. "We had 10 dogs and on average they only lived about 4 years. That's about a ninth of our life span so there you go."

    And considering it was worked out in 1268 it's likely that dog life expectancy would have been far lower then than now. Average human life expectancy was about 35 (!!!!) or maybe 45 (if you make it through childhood). So 35/9 = 4 (roughly) or 45/9 = 5. The dogs would more likely have been working animals so susceptible to injury. And a bunch of stuff we treat (heartworm, tapeworms, ticks, parvo, etc) would have been largely untreatable and life threatening.

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