How To Get A Good Night's Sleep In Hotel Rooms

Get better sleep in a hotel roomIPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock

Sleep is important, however when you're traveling across country to conferences or a wedding, you need to stay somewhere. Hotels are generally the best option for any stay, however it can be hard to get a good amount of sleep to keep your mind sharp and to keep you from getting tired throughout your busy day. So how do you get a good night sleep when you’re away from home? Here are some of the best techniques that you can use to help you get a better night sleep.

#1 Open The Windows

Sometimes you may not get a good night sleep because the air is too stuffy, dry or over deodorised from the cleaning solution that was used previously. This type of air and smell can disrupt your sleep due to a feeling of constricted breathing. To help alleviate this all you need to do is open the window and allow some fresh air in.

If for some reason you can’t open the windows, turn the ceiling fan on to help promote air circulation. You can then add some moisture to a room by getting the steam from a hot shower into the room by leaving the bathroom door open. However, if there's a smoke alarm in your room or near the bathroom, ask the hotel first to see whether it's okay to do this as some smoke alarms will activate. This will cause the fire brigade to automatically come which can be a costly endeavour leading into the thousands of dollars in fines.

#2 Change To A Smaller Mattress Room

Believe it or not, if your mattress is too soft you may not sleep well. King beds are especially soft due to their size and although may be comfortable for a while, they can cause problems with sleep because you may have trouble rolling over. This will cause you to drift in and out of sleep when you have to move. Instead opt for rooms that offer queen or single beds as these tend to be firmer and easier to roll in.

#3 Walls Are Too Thin

When the walls are too thin you tend to hear more exterior noise. This is a problem if you’re close to a street or if you have loud neighbours who like to turn their TV up loud. To help combat this, if possible try to aim for a corner room at the edge of the building. Rooms at the edge of buildings generally have thicker walls which help to buffer the noise a lot better. This will help to minimise the noise and help you to get more sleep. If the hotel has elevators, try to get a room which is furthest from it to minimise continuous wake ups in the night.

#4 Avoid Large Meals Before Bed

Before going to bed, it’s advisable to avoid eating a large meal. Larger meals tend to sit on the stomach longer which can cause you to have heartburn or weight on your chest when you’re lying down. Instead, eat a moderate meal and take a snack back to the room with you if you’re allowed to. This will curb any cravings that you may get in the night if access to food is limited.

#5 Relax And Unwind

Last but not least, try to relax and unwind. Getting a good night sleep comes down to how you relax and unwind after a big day. Try to switch off all your devices a few hours before bed. Use the TV, read a book, or write down any thoughts that are going through your head to help you completely shut off. Being relaxed before bed will help make you sleep better.


When it comes to staying in a hotel for conferences, there are a few things that you can do to make your sleep easier. By following these tips above, you can make your stay more enjoyable. So are you heading out for a conference soon? Let us know in the comments.

Matt Garrett is a venue co-ordinator who organises, plans, and runs large conferences, weddings and other events at different venue locations, and currently writes for Mercure Ballarat


Comments

    6. Get the right pillow.

    Many hotels (especially those catering to conferences) offer a range of pillows based on size/firmness. But most places won't provide this unless asked for. It certainly helps me as the typically far-too-soft defaults arc up my neck injury.

    7. Away from the lifts

    The corridors near the lifts on each floor are high traffic areas. While room walls are often reasonably well insulated for sound, doors aren't. It's rare for hotels to be completely booked out, and even if they are, checking in early allows the front desk to reallocate rooms. So, it's worth asking to be well away from the lifts or muster areas.

    Last edited 20/08/16 11:25 am

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