Track Attackers On Your Corporate Network For Valuable Security Insight

Cybersecurity is already a top priority for a lot of organisations. Now, with the Federal Government's investment in this space, it’s a good time for companies to re-evaluate their approach to IT security and weave in some offensive measures when fighting against cybercriminals that are trying to gain access to their corporate networks.

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There are a host of vendors that sell cybersecurity solutions to businesses to protect them against attackers. For bigger organisations, sometimes it's not enough to play the defensive game, according to Trent Heisler global vice-president of solutions engineering at LogRhythm, a security intelligence vendor. He was a speaker at the Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSI) 2016 Conference earlier this month.

Large organisations are often swamped by attempts from hackers to gain access to their networks. Security teams can reactively respond to more serious incidents but Heisler recommends a proactive approach to attacks.

"If an organisation is mature enough in terms of their security strategy, they could consider turning the tables on cybercriminals," he told Lifehacker Australia. "Organisations can set up traps, such as Honeypots. Once an attacker enters the network and accesses those honeypots, they can be tracked. You can then understand their tactics and possibly find out who they are in the process.

"Without such crucial data, it’s difficult to know whether or not an adversary has actually been removed from the environment."

The insight that you gain from analysing the behaviour of attackers could not only help your business learn how to better ward off cybercriminals but it can also aid other organisations in the public and private sector, Heisler said. This is the kind of collaboration that the Federal Government is encouraging as part of its $230 million Cyber Security Defence Strategy.


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