How Much Can You Save From Giving Up Small Luxuries? [Infographic]

It's nice to start your day with a cup of coffee but would you give it up to add a huge chunk of cash into your retirement fund? Your gut instinct may be "no", but perhaps you'll change your mind when you see just how much you can save. Here's an infographic that breaks down the amount of money you can put into your superannuation if you cut down on small vices.

Coffee drinking hipster image from Shutterstock

The infographic below from RateCity gives you an idea of the money you can put aside to contribute to your superannuation fund if you gave up on some of the finer things in life. Well, you don't have to save the money for retirement, but it would be a wise and grown-up thing to do.

[From RateCity]


Comments

    Woman: Do you drink beer?
    Man: Yes
    Woman: How many beers a day?
    Man: Usually about 3
    Woman: How much do you pay per beer?
    Man: $5.00 which includes a tip
    Woman: And how long have you been drinking?
    Man: About 20 years, I suppose
    Woman: So a beer costs $5.00 and you have 3 beers a day which puts your spending each month at $450.00. In one year, it would be approximately $5400, correct?
    Man: Correct
    Woman: If in 1 year you spend $5400, not accounting for inflation, the past 20 years puts your spending at $108,000; correct?
    Man: Correct
    Woman: Do you know that if you didn't drink so much beer, that money could have been put in a step-up interest savings account and after accounting for compound interest for the past 20 years, you could have now bought a Ferrari?
    Man: Do you drink beer?
    Woman: No.
    Man: Where's your Ferrari?

    Haha! Gold!

    Enjoy your lonely retirement. You will have no friends, because everyone has long ago worked out you are a miserable tight-arse who never enjoys anything.

    by the time you're old enough to reap some of the rewards you will be too old to appreciate certain things and think back wishing man I wish I had done this and that instead of being a TIGHT ARSE!

    I get what the article is saying, but my own personal preference for saving money (or being a tight-arse if you will), is to 'downgrade' things rather than eliminating them entirely. Some examples include:
    - Going to Vietnamese/Thai places when going out for dinner (usually much cheaper, and still a lot of good tasting food)
    - Having coffee from the machine at work rather than the shop downstairs
    - Using homebrand/Aldi goods (case-by-case basis, some products I can't tell the difference, some products are obviously inferior - you'll need to experiment with your tastes to find what you can't tell the difference between)
    - Waiting for Steam sales rather than buying as new releases

    Good article you got! we need to balance what we "want" and what we "need". because sometimes we buy things that we do not really need, we need to think first before you buy something.

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