The Complete Baby Cheat Sheet For First-Time Parents [Infographic]

Being a first-time parent can be a terrifying experience -- especially if you didn't bother to read any baby care books. This infographic from BabyFollow lays out the basics including how to bathe, swaddle and breastfeed your bub, nappy changing tips, sleeping techniques and how to determine if your newborn is really a monkey. (We made that last one up, obviously.)

Photo: Getty Images

Newborns require a great deal of work and the process can be stressful for first-time parents. If you're feeling lost and overwhelmed, this chart will help you to at least get the basics right. It even includes some "baby whisperer" style tips to interpret different types of cries.

[Via BabyFollow]


Comments

    id like to complain about is article as it shows a depiction of breast feeding.

      Only if her nipple is in the middle of her chest.

    first baby and you treat it like a porcelain doll trying to dress it without hurting it, by the third baby you are shoving those little arms in the arm holes like your packing fudge.

    and who said the umbilical cord cant get wet?

    The best piece of advise i could give you in looking after newborns, is about 9 months too late.

      Or to put it another way:

      When your first baby eats a bug you rush it to the emergency room. When your second baby eats a bug you keep a watchful eye on them. When your third baby eats a bug you think "well, that's their dinner sorted."

    Get in to a routine! (Both of you)
    Don't worry about being quiet when the baby is sleeping!
    Don't stress! - Kind of hard if you're a noob.

    I didn't read baby books and always avoided advice from anyone because all babies are different. My mantra was let the baby show you how to care for them, and they seriously do grow up so fast, so enjoy all the good and bad. Now I have a nearly 9 year old, babies were a breeze.

    PS the cord can get wet just dry it

    Why does this article only assume female gender of the baby? I could only see "her" being used. Not a single picture of a male parent either.

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