Seven Tasty Recipes Made From Bland Leftovers [Infographic]

Australia has a pretty severe food wastage problem. According to a recent poll, the average Aussie household wastes well over $1000 worth of food per year. Part of the problem is that leftovers unequivocally suck: who wants to eat days-old food that wasn't good enough to finish off in the first place? These seven simple leftover mashups might make you change your mind.

Leftovers image from Shutterstock

The following leftover recipe hacks come from the self-reliability blog Happy To Survive. It reveals how to make the most out of common leftovers by combining them with other foods and kitchen staples.

In addition to reducing your sense of guilt, repurposing food that would otherwise be thrown out can also be good for your wallet. Instead of tossing your scraps in the bin, try rumbling together one of these recipes instead:

You can find links to each of the above recipes on Happy To Survive's website. Bon app├ętit!

[Via Happy To Survive]

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Comments

    Please stop using these senseless 'info graphics '. They don't present any thing graphically - no clear summary icons, no informative graphs. They're just a means is spicing up your content with color and image. But they are not responsive (the experience on a mobile phone is shocking, forcing lots of zoom and scroll) and probably not very friendly for users of assistive technology.

      Hi there, thanks for your feedback - we do label all of our articles containing infographics with the [Infographic] tag you'll see in this headline, which is worth looking out for if you want to avoid seeing this type of content in future.

        The problem is that some info graphics are useful - they present information in a way that adds to understanding the content. The graphics show relative sizes, or other key information that helps identify trends or items that I am interested in drilling further into. Others are just a waste of time. I'm asking that you be more selective, and not just dismiss my comment as 'oh you can avoid them based on the tag'.

        I suggest you test any info graphic on a mobile and determine whether there is any useful content that can be derived at very small text scales. At the moment they seem to be used just because they look pretty.

        I understand many of them are just reposts from other sites (which you can't do anything about), but please apply some judgement!

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