A Simple Plan To Start Reading More

A Simple Plan to Start Reading More

I love the physical nature of having books up there on the bookshelves, waiting to be looked at, admired and remembered. I used to really enjoyed the library and I still do. But when I look at my shelves I realise that I own so many books that I haven't read. This post originally appeared on Medium.

I bought them because I learned over time that for me to own a book — intellectually — I needed to own the damn book. I needed to have it close by for reference. I needed to be able to write in it and take it down off the shelf and put it back on the shelf and take it down off the shelf and put it back on the — you get it.

So I went about building my "anti-library" of unread books, and today, even after giving away hundreds of books, my shelves are stocked with books I haven't read. But I keep adding.

Looking at my shelves recently, I saw a book I'd wanted to read for the longest time, and in fact had started over the summer, stopping after about 150 pages to move on to more "immediate" reads. The book I put down was The Power Broker by Robert Caro. It's a classic on power politics in New York in the early to middle 20th century, seen through the eyes of the brilliant and wicked Robert Moses. The glory and curse of the book, though, is that it's a doorstopper. It runs at about 1110 pages — dense ones. I think Caro said it came to about 700,000 words. (Which was down from his original finished draft of over a million.)

It's awesomely well written, not a slog in any sense of the word, but even great books take time just due to sheer volume. The problem is, when you think about reading a book like that, even taking it off the shelf seems to generate anxiety. Let's do the maths: I'm a pretty good reader, I think I read in the neighbourhood of 300 words per minute. It might be plus or minus 50 words, but my guess is that's a close estimate for a text written in modern English prose.

At 300 words per minute, a 700,000 word text is going to take me 2333 minutes, or about 39 hours to read. And there's the issue: the brain doesn't seem to like to get started on 39 hour projects it isn't being paid to complete. So, most commonly, we pick something shorter and easier. Still counts, right?

Then I thought about all of the other great works I wanted to get to in my lifetime. Caro has four (eventually five) books about LBJ that are masterpieces on 20th century American politics. I want to read Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. I want to read Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and War and Peace. I want to read Boswell's Johnson. Shirer's Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations. More of Ron Chernow's biographies. (Titan is one of my favourites of all time and I hear great things about Alexander Hamilton.) All doorstoppers.

That got me thinking. How the heck does anyone get these books read? How do I become a person that's read all these books rather than talked about them? I do a lot of reading for Farnam Street, but it's hard to take a week off from our standard fare to sit and read War and Peace. It's the same for any busy person with a profession that takes up their days.

The solution I devised for myself is a simple one: It's 25 pages a day. That's it. Just commit to that, and then do it. What will 25 pages a day get you?

Let's say that two days out of each month, you probably won't have time to read. Plus Christmas. That gives you 340 days a year of solid reading time. Twenty-five pages a day for 340 days is 8400 pages. Eight thousand, four hundred. What I have also found is that, when I commit to a minimum of 25 pages, I almost always read more. So let's call the 8400 pages 10,000. (I'd only need to extend that 25 pages into 30 to get there.)

With 10,000 pages a year, at a general pace of 25/day, what can we get done?

Well, like I said at the start, The Power Broker is 1100 pages. The four LBJ books are collectively 3552 pages. Tolstoy's two masterpieces come in at a combined 2160. Gibbons is six volumes and runs to about 3660 pages. That's 10,472 pages. That means, in about one year, at a modest pace of 25 pages a day, I've knocked out 13 masterful works and learned an enormous amount about the history of the world. In one year!

That leaves 2017 to read Shirer's Rise and Fall (1280), Carl Sandburg's six volumes on Lincoln (2000?), Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations unabridged (1200) and Boswell's Johnson (1300) with plenty of pages left to read something else.

This is how the great works gets read. Day by day. Twenty-five pages at a time. No excuses.

Before anyone takes this too literally, the point isn't the number. (Although 25 pages is my literal rule.) It could be 20 pages, or 10 pages, or thirty minutes, or an hour, or 2000 words. Regardless of what "unit" of reading you choose, the maths will still work out: In six months, or a year, or five years, or ten years, you'll have digested a large swath of human wisdom. Did you ever want to read Moby Dick? Or Ulysses? Or some of Jane Austen's books? Or David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest? Done! Start today. Twenty-five pages. Then do it tomorrow. Read in the morning, read at lunch, read before bed, read at the dentist's office, it doesn't matter. Just get your pages in, day in and day out. And then you'll be a person who reads the books everyone else simply talks about.

What you choose to read is up to you. I love history. I love biography. I love science. Tolstoy aside, I don't read many novels. But the task no longer seems daunting, does it? All it takes is commitment and a little assiduity. So let's go get smart.

Image by iunewind (Shutterstock).


Comments

    Some people count audio books as reading. I know a few intelligent well learned people that would rather have it this way. Obviously study text books are not something they would count, but factual books and fiction are considered ok.

    Would you count it as reading?

    I can listen to a book such as the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy and can retain a reasonable portion of the storyline, even though I listen while driving. Although I find the narrator of the book itself can be a make or break for the audio, as if it is not read well, it becomes monotonous very quickly.

      I really struggle to understand and retain plot points when I am listening to them vs reading them.

      One of my friends often wants to read me his boyfriends texts and ask for my advice - and aside from the fact that we're in our 30s and that makes me feel like I'm a teenager - I often I have to ask him to repeat things, or let me read it myself, if I really want to focus and understand it.

    Getting through a lot of the no-longer-canon Star Wars like this ...

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