Turn Your Windows 10 Computer Into A Wi-Fi Hotspot

If you have a Windows computer with a wired internet connection, you may want to share that with other devices. You can do this with a little command line trickery to turn your desktop into a Wi-Fi hotspot.

While technically this has been possible for a while, the process has changed over the years. You can check out the new steps for Windows 10 in the video above from tech blog Techniqued, or follow the steps here:

  1. Press Win+X to open the power user settings menu and choose "Command Prompt (Admin)".
  2. Enter the following command, replacing the values for SSID and key with the network name and password you want: netsh wlan set hostednetwork mode=allow ssid=AdHoc key=password
  3. Run the following command to start the network: netsh wlan start hostednetwork
  4. Search in the Start menu for "View network connections."
  5. Right-click your main ethernet connection and choose "Properties."
  6. Under the "Sharing" tab, click the box labelled "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's internet connection."
  7. In the drop down below the above box, choose the network connection that currently has internet access. Click OK.

At this point, you'll have a brand new Wi-Fi network that's connected to your home internet. Keep in mind that this will only work as long as the Windows machine that's running the network is active. This also isn't a total replacement for a proper router, but it can get you by in a pinch.

How to Create a Wi-Fi Hotspot in Windows 10


Comments

    "If you have a Windows computer with a wired internet connection, you may want to share that with other devices. You can do this with a little command line trickery to turn your desktop into a Wi-Fi hotspot."

    Did I miss something here? How are we supposed to do this if our "Windows computer" *only* has a wired connection? Does the "command line trickery" conjure up a piece of WiFi hardware out of thin air?

    Inquiring minds want to know (and save $$ by not having to buy WiFi hardware).

      There's a few reasons you'd do this:

      Your office computer is wired by ethernet, and you want to turn your computer into a wifi hotspot so you can use your phone/tablet on your the same internet connection your PC/laptop is using.

      It also works with those USB mobile broadband devices, you may want to share that device with other devices. (This is how I've used it).

      You could also use it for reasons not related to internet, such as connecting devices to your PC directly if you want to transfer files, SSH, remote admin etc. etc. etc.

    Many people have a wired connection and a wifi card in their machine... not rocket science.

    Tried setting up an adhoc network using netsh on a Windows 8.1 machine last week, using ICS to share my phones data connection (tethered via USB).

    Could get tethering going fine on it's own.
    Could get the adhoc network working.
    Could not get both to work together. Pretty pathetic if you ask me. While this isn't a feature that would be in regular use by a lot of people, I think it is something that should be a well working core feature (saying that, lots of Windows networking components are a shambles).

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