This Graphic Helps You Pick Your First Programming Language

When you're first getting started learning to code, one of the hardest choices can be picking which programming language to kick off with. This infographic can help you choose by comparing options based on application, potential salary and popularity.

Not all programming languages are created equal. While it's a good idea to first find a problem to solve and work from there, if you're considering a programming career and need some more long-term ideas before you commit, this graphic from online education service Udacity can help.

It breaks down which language is good for different types of applications (like web development, mobile app development, etc.), average salaries (US) and popularity of each language. You may not get an obvious, direct answer for your specific needs, but it can give you plenty of data to point you in the right direction.

4 Ways to Pick Your First Programming Language [Udacity]


Comments

    There is so much wrong with this graphic it's difficult to know where to begin.

    1. Not all of those languages are programming languages, many are scripting.
    2. Knowing a particular language isn't what determines your wage. I would wager that Matlab wages are so high because it is predominantly used by engineers.
    3. The languages stated as being useful for web development are incomplete and/or the graphic does not clarify what is considered "Web Development".
    4. There are so many other languages that could be considered for a first language. Many that I would recommend over some already listed.

      Well, feel free to recommend the many.

      Yeah and the popularity rankings are based on searches on their own web site ... which certainly favours newer "trendy" languages like Python and Ruby.

      Considering C# is used for ASP.NET & ASP.NET MVC which are quite popular (and now open source), excluding it from "Web Development" is a bit strange.

      I'm also surprised to see JavaScript interest so low, since a lot of modern web development is heavily javascript based (eg. Angular JS). Although again this is skewed by the source of the data.

      In response to your #1, in the real world there is no appreciable difference between programming and scripting; they both involve the same logical problem solving process, both have remarkably similar results, and can both provide extensive employment opportunities (depending on industry of course).

      Honestly I really struggle to find any way in which the distinction is in any way meaningful in the real world, other than as a way for so-called "real programmers" to belittle those who "only script".

      I don't particularly agree with using this list to choose either, but the fact that you included "scripting not programming" at all let alone as your #1 point would personally leave me questioning the value of your opinion.

      Last edited 22/07/15 10:13 am

        In response to your #1, in the real world there is no appreciable difference between programming and scripting; they both involve the same logical problem solving process, both have remarkably similar results, and can both provide extensive employment opportunities (depending on industry of course).
        Agreed. No question.

        The problem I have with calling scripting languages, programming languages is that that's not what they are. It's semantics. Words carry specific meanings. If a word exists that can convey the correct meaning then it should be used. In this case the word coding would have worked, or even just using the joined programming/scripting.

        Programming and scripting are different, but both are useful.

    Data source is from the US. Last time I looked lifehacker.com.au has an .AU so it should be more relevant to Australia. Then when you write, need to break down between states as different coding pays oh so differently. Sydney and Melbourne, Canberra etc...

    Good to see that objective C isn't on the list

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