Australian Charity Offers A Digital Licence With Internet Quizzes For Students

Just like the old pen licence you had to get back in primary school, kids now have the opportunity to try their hand at a "digital" licence. Rather than being an official document to certify children as internet citizen, the Digtial Licence is a project by The Alannah and Madeline Foundation to educate children on the ins and outs of the online world.

Acquisition of a licence is a two-step process. First, you'll need to purchase access for $30, after which a series of eight quizzes need to be passed successfully. If you're a Year Six teacher, it's possible to get a classroom licence for free, thanks to Google and community options are also available.

The website states the program was developed in conjunction with a "team of experts", of which you can find more information on via the site's Thank You section. For those after testimonials, a few can be found here.

A sample quiz is available if you need a preview and the video above explains some of the concepts involved.

Digital Licence [Official site, via the ABC]


Comments

    I don't like this.. You shouldn't have to have anyone's permission to use the internet, it shouldn't have to be "okay'd", it should be something we're all able to use, at any time, regardless of circumstance.. It's become an indispensable part of being human.. like the right to live freely, the right to an education, so too should be the right to use the internet.

      You're right. When I went to school a "computer license" was a big thing, all the teachers were getting one.
      https://www.acs.org.au/about-the-acs/icdl

      I'm just suspicious of the fees being an externally administered course.

      I've heard way too many stories of kids getting into trouble online (and I've met kids that really, REALLY needed it). There's too much stuff to be careful of: predators, computer security, cyberbullying and the ability to deal with it, spending on apps and microtransactions, social media shenanigans. And all that stuff can do serious damage to a person in the right (wrong) circumstances. So, if there's a cheap course that someone could use to help educate a 8-12 year old, who likely has no other source of understanding this complicated stuff, I can't see that as a problem. Just sounds good

        I agree with you.. I have no problem with educating children (hell, anyone) on precautions they should taken, dangers they should avoid, etc etc... but I don't like it done under the guise of a "licence"..

    Strikes me as being yet another "tool" to help parents offload the role and responsibility of, oh y'know, actually being a parent...

Join the discussion!

Trending Stories Right Now