The Madness Of Traffic Roundabouts Explained For Every State

No matter how experienced a driver you are, there's a pretty good chance you have no idea what you're doing when it comes to roundabouts. Are you allowed to turn right from any lane? What happens when multiple cars enter at the same time? And what's the deal with all those weird clock face analogies?

Roundabout picture from Shutterstock

Roundabouts are regularly cited as being among the worst intersections for vehicle crashes each year. This is partially due to the high volume of traffic in these areas, but driver error also plays a significant part. Simply put, some people don't know what's expected of them when they approach one of these sinister circular islands — instead, they just force their way in as soon as there's a gap and hope for the best.

In an attempt to make sense of this unchecked chaos, we've assembled the official roundabout rules for each state and territory, as outlined by the relevant road authorities. The rules are pretty similar for the most part, although there are a few small differences such as Victoria's allowances for trams. We've also included the official roundabout road safety videos, where available.

NSW

Approaching a roundabout

Drivers approaching a roundabout must use their indicator if they intend to turn left or right, or make a U-turn at the roundabout. They must give other road users sufficient notice of their intent to turn.

Entering a roundabout

Drivers must slow or stop to give way to any vehicle already in the roundabout. Drivers must also continue to use their indicator if they intend to turn left, right or make a U-turn.

Turning left

Drivers must indicate left on approach and be travelling in the left-hand lane (unless there are road markings with other instructions), stay in the left lane and exit in the left lane.

Going straight ahead

There is no requirement for drivers to signal when approaching the roundabout, if they are going straight ahead. Drivers may approach the roundabout from either the left or right lane (unless there are road markings with other instructions).

Going straight ahead

There is no requirement for drivers to signal when approaching the roundabout, if they are going straight ahead. Drivers may approach the roundabout from either the left or right lane (unless there are road markings with other instructions).

Making a U-turn

When using a roundabout to make a U-turn, drivers must approach in the right lane and signal right.

Changing lanes in a roundabout

Drivers may change lanes in a roundabout if they wish. The usual road rules for changing lanes apply. Drivers must use their indicator and give way to any vehicle in the lane they are entering.

Exiting a roundabout

Just like exiting any road, drivers must signal left when leaving a roundabout, if it is practical to do so, and stop indicating as soon as they have exited the roundabout. When travelling straight ahead on a small single lane roundabout, it may be impractical to indicate left when exiting.

Victoria:

When entering a roundabout, the driver must give way to any vehicle already in the roundabout as well as any tram that is entering or approaching the roundabout. Once in the roundabout, a driver must give way to a tram, or a bus travelling along tram tracks that is in, entering or approaching the roundabout.

As you prepare to enter the roundabout, indicate as you normally would: left to turn left, right to turn right and no indicator if you are going straight ahead. Remember to indicate long enough to give sufficient warning to other drivers and pedestrians about where you plan to go.

Before entering a roundabout, a drive must indicate if turning left or right for long enough to give sufficient warning to other drivers and pedestrians.

If you are going to leave the roundabout more than halfway around, then you should indicate right. Halfway around is defined as leaving on a road that is substantially straight ahead from the road you entered on.

The difference to other intersections is in exiting. Where practicable, give a left change of direction signal when leaving the roundabout. Drivers are not required to give way to pedestrians when leaving a roundabout, but commonsense should prevail.

When driving in a roundabout, if you are changing lanes or lines of traffic, again indicate as you would normally do.

Queensland

It is important to be in the correct lane at multi-lane roundabouts. Signs, lane markings and arrows help you position your vehicle correctly and guide you in the direction you want to go.

Unless traffic lane arrows indicate otherwise, remember these rules:

  • to turn left, use the left lane
  • to turn right, use the right lane
  • to go straight ahead, use either lane

Turning left

To turn left at a roundabout, use the left lane.

  1. Position your vehicle in the left lane unless arrows on the road or signs indicate otherwise.
  2. Use your left indicator when you enter the roundabout.
  3. Give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.
  4. Remain in the left lane as you complete your turn.
  5. Continue to use your left indicator as you exit the roundabout.
  6. Stop indicating once you have exited the roundabout.

Turning right or U-turns

To turn right or do a u-turn at a roundabout, use the right lane.

  1. Position your vehicle in the right lane unless arrows on the road or signs indicate otherwise.
  2. Use your right indicator when you enter the roundabout.
  3. Give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.
  4. Before exiting, use your left indicator and follow the exit lane marking.
  5. Stop indicating as soon as you have left the roundabout.

Note: Do not turn right from the left lane unless arrows on the road indicate otherwise.

Going straight ahead

To go straight ahead at a roundabout, use either lane.

  1. Position your vehicle in either lane unless the arrows on the road or signs indicate otherwise.
  2. Do not use your indicator until ready to exit.
  3. Give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.
  4. Before exiting, use your left indicator and follow the exit lane marking.
  5. Stop indicating once you have exited the roundabout.

Who gives way at a roundabout?

A vehicle approaching a roundabout must give way to all vehicles already on the roundabout.

In some cases on a multi-lane roundabout, it may be necessary to change lanes before exiting. In this situation, it is the responsibility of the driver changing lanes to give way to vehicles in the lane the driver is moving to.

Another way of looking at roundabouts

Turns that occur at roundabouts can be described by imagining the roundabout to be a clock face. Any turn that exits the roundabout before 12 o'clock can be considered a left turn. Any turn that exits after 12 o'clock can be considered a right turn.

The Queensland Road Rules uses the terms 'less than half-way round' and 'more that half-way around'. Straight ahead at a roundabout is taken to be at half-way around or at 12 o'clock.

South Australia

When approaching a single-lane roundabout, you must decide which exit you want to leave by:

  • if you intend to turn left (leave before you are half way round), you must give a change of direction signal to your left as you approach
  • if you intend to turn right (leave after half way round), you must give a change of direction signal to your right as you approach
  • if you intend to go straight on, you do not need to give a change of direction signal as you approach.

When approaching a multi-lane roundabout, you must:

  • decide which exit you want to leave by
  • position your vehicle in the correct lane before you reach the roundabout
  • signal (left or right) if you intend turning at the roundabout

On a multi-lane roundabout, lane arrows and signs will tell you which lane to use, depending on where you want to exit the roundabout.

As a general rule, if you want to take the first exit on the left, you must choose the left lane. If you want to go straight on, you can use either lane, and if you want to turn right - leaving from the third or any subsequent exits you must chose the right-hand lane, always remembering to give a change of direction signal.

You must also choose the right-hand lane if you want to go all the way round and return the way you came.

You must Give Way to vehicles already in the roundabout. You should also take particular care of vehicles approaching or about to enter from your right because they may enter the roundabout before you.

Bicycle riders are permitted to turn right at a multi-lane roundabout provided they give way to any vehicle exiting the roundabout. Drivers must remember to look out for those cyclists stopped in the left lane who are giving way to exiting vehicles.

In a roundabout

At all times, you should signal with your indicators to let other drivers know your intentions. Immediately before leaving the roundabout (i.e. when passing the exit before your exit) you must signal with your left indicator, unless it is impracticable to do so. For example, the roundabout may be too small to allow your indicator to operate. This tells drivers waiting to enter the roundabout where you intend to exit.

Western Australia

Keeping left

When driving around roundabouts you must keep left of the central island at all times. If you intend to change lanes in a roundabout then you must signal your intention to do so.

However, it is safer to position your vehicle in the correct lane before you enter a roundabout so that you do not have to change lanes.

Giving way

At a roundabout, you must always travel in a clockwise direction; and when entering the roundabout, give way to all vehicles travelling within the roundabout. Remember that large vehicles such as buses and trucks may need more than one lane to enter or leave a roundabout.

Turning left at next exit

At a roundabout you must:

  • Approach from the left lane
  • Indicate left
  • Stay in the left lane
  • Exit in the left lane

Driving straight through a roundabout

    You do not have to indicate when you are approaching the roundabout unless road markings or signs say otherwise, approach from either the left or right lane and drive in that lane throughout the roundabout.

    Signal left, if practicable, just after you have passed the last exit before the one you wish to use and exit in the same lane in which you entered (that is, in the left lane if you entered in the left lane and in the right lane if you entered in the right lane).

    Turning right or making a ‘U’ turn

    When turning right or making a ‘U’ turn, approach from the right lane, indicate right before entering the roundabout. Stay in the right lane and signal left, if practicable, just after you have passed the last exit before the one you wish to use.

    Signs at roundabouts

    Roundabouts are intersections where there is a central island around which vehicles travel in one direction. There is normally a Roundabout Sign at each entrance. Some roundabouts have more than one lane on approach roads and arrows on the road to let you know what direction you must travel through the roundabout. Some also have advance warning signs to warn you the roundabout is ahead.

    If there are arrows marked on the road surface you must drive in the direction they indicate.

    Tasmania

    Giving way

    When approaching a roundabout, adjust your speed to stop safely if needed. Before entering a roundabout, give way to all traffic in the roundabout.

    Entering and leaving roundabouts

    When you’re leaving the roundabout less than half way round it:

    • indicate left when approaching and leaving the roundabout
    • on a multi-lane roundabout, enter and leave the roundabout from the left lane, or a lane with a left arrow in it.

    When you’re going straight ahead at a roundabout:

    • on a multi-lane roundabout, you can enter and leave the roundabout from any lane with a straight ahead arrow
    • on a multi-lane roundabout, if there are no arrows marked in the lanes, you can enter and leave the roundabout from any lane
    • you only need to indicate left when leaving the roundabout (where practical)

    When you’re going more than halfway round a roundabout:

    • indicate right as you approach the roundabout
    • on a multi-lane roundabout, enter from the right lane, or a lane with a right arrow indicate left as you leave the roundabout (where practical)

    You can change lanes in a multi-lane roundabout, when:

    • it is safe and legal to do so AND;
    • you indicate your intention to change lanes
    • ACT

      Entering a roundabout from a multi-lane road or a road with two or more lines of traffic travelling in the same direction:

      A driver entering a roundabout from a multi-lane road, or a road with two or more lines of traffic travelling in the same direction as the driver, must enter the roundabout in accordance with these rules.

      Leaving a roundabout less than halfway around it:

      If the driver is to leave the roundabout less than halfway around it, the driver must enter the roundabout from the left marked lane or left line of traffic.

      In simple terms: When approaching a multi-lane roundabout with the intention of turning left; approach in the left hand lane, operate the left hand indicator before entering the roundabout and continue to indicate throughout the turn.

      Leaving a roundabout halfway around it

      A driver leaves a roundabout halfway around the roundabout, if the driver leaves the roundabout on a road that is straight ahead, or substantially straight ahead, from the road on which the driver enters the roundabout.

      In simple terms: When approaching a multi-lane roundabout with the intention of continuing straight ahead, approach in either the left or right hand lane and operate the left hand indicator when leaving the roundabout.

      Entering a roundabout:

      It is not a requirement to indicate before entering a roundabout if you are proceeding straight ahead and intend leaving the roundabout half way around it.

      Leaving a roundabout more than halfway around it:

      If the driver is to leave the roundabout more than halfway around it, the driver must enter the roundabout from the right marked lane or right line of traffic.

      In simple terms: When approaching a multi-lane roundabout with the intention of turning to the right, approach in the right hand lane and operate the right hand indicator before entering the roundabout, continue to operate the indicator until approaching the exit lane and then indicate left.

      Continuing all the way around a roundabout

      If the driver is to drive all the way around the roundabout, or more than three quarters of the way around it, the driver must enter the roundabout from the right marked lane or right line of traffic.

      In simple terms: When approaching a multi-lane roundabout with the intention of continuing all the way around the roundabout (U-turn), approach in the right hand lane, operate the right hand indicator before entering the roundabout and continue to operate the indicator until exiting the roundabout in the right hand lane.

      Giving way when entering a roundabout

      A driver entering a roundabout must give way to any vehicle in the roundabout.

      Driving in a roundabout to the left of the central traffic island.

      A driver driving in a roundabout must drive to the left of the central traffic island in the roundabout.

      Obeying traffic lane arrows when driving in or leaving a roundabout

      If a driver is driving in a marked lane in a roundabout and there are traffic lane arrows applying to the lane, the driver must:

      • if the arrows indicate a single direction, drive in or leave the roundabout in that direction; or
      • if the arrows indicate 2 or more directions, drive in or leave the roundabout in one of those directions.

      Giving a change of direction signal when changing marked lanes or lines of traffic in a roundabout

      A driver driving in a roundabout must:

      • give a left change of direction signal before the driver changes marked lanes to the left, or enters a line of traffic to the left, in the roundabout;
      • give a right change of direction signal before the driver changes marked lanes to the right, or enters a line of traffic to the right, in the roundabout.

      Giving a left change of direction signal when leaving a roundabout

      If practicable, a driver driving in a roundabout must give a left change of direction signal when leaving the roundabout.

      The driver must stop giving the change of direction signal as soon as the driver has left the roundabout. This rule does not apply to a driver if the driver’s vehicle is not fitted with direction indicator lights.

      Giving way by the rider of a bicycle or animal to a vehicle leaving a roundabout

      The rider of a bicycle or animal who is riding in the far left marked lane of a roundabout with two or more marked lanes, or the far left line of traffic in a roundabout with two or more lines of traffic, must give way to any vehicle leaving the roundabout.

      Northern Territory

      Approaching a roundabout

      Vehicles entering a roundabout must give way to any vehicle already in the roundabout. Giving way at a roundabout

      Means the driver must slow down and, if necessary, stop to avoid a collision.

      Turning left

      You must approach the roundabout in the left lane, signal left, stay in the left lane and exit into the left lane.

      Going straight ahead

      Do not signal when approaching the roundabout. You can approach the roundabout from either left or right lanes (unless there are road markings with other instructions), drive in the same lane through the roundabout and exit in the same lane.

      Turning right

      You must approach in the right lane, signal right, stay in the right lane and exit into the right lane.

      Making a U-turn

      When you use the roundabout to make a U-turn you must approach in the right lane, signal right, stay in the right lane and exit into the right lane.

      Exiting a roundabout

      You must signal left when leaving the roundabout.



Comments

    Ahh, the humble roundabout, i do not know how many times i have been cut off in the right hand lane when a car in the left suddenly decides he wants to turn right, my dad t-boned a car from it, lucky our car had a roo bar on the front and was low speed but long story short he was in the wrong by cutting him off but the other car needed a new drivers door.

    My local roundabout is a two lane free for all, always fun times driving through it.

      For once I'm glad I live in the ACT where everyone seems to know how to use a roundabout. Except the flogbags who take the racers line going straight.

    After living in the act then moving to melbourne, I am ammused when they call canberra the circle city even though there are more roundabouts here, yet know one knows how to use them. The amount of times ive gotten to one and no one is going. Every one is giving way to each other. Then when they do go they forget there are two lanes and start on the left cut into the right lane then exit in the left lane.

    I went to Jakarta earlier this year. They have a completely different idea of how roudabouts work.

    From my view, it looks like the cars in the roundabout should always give way to those entering the roundabout.

    To shame a specific location - Townsville, QLD - it seems no one knows how to use indicators and no one has the ability to read traffic or merge.
    Approach a roundabout and most people stop, then check if they have to give way - how about you slow down, read the traffic and continue if there is no one to give way to.
    Others DON'T indicate left or right but turn anyway - indicators are optional in all situations in Townsville.
    Don't get me started on multi-lane roundabouts - MERGE people, MERGE!

      I would agree but extend that to ALL of QUEENSLAND. I live on the Gold Coast and it is constantly scary how bad people are when it comes to Roundabouts.

    It sounds so simple these instructions yet everytime i come to a roundabout, it seems you are asking people to solve a maths equation when they approach. Then you get the people who make up their own rules. For instance, indicating to tell you they are going straight, by first putting their left indicator on then their right indicator, no such thing as a straight indicator. Then there are the ones that don't realise not all roundabouts are the same as some are smaller and some are larger so therefore 2 cars may not fit on certain roundabouts.

    Don't forget the ones who decide at the last moment to duck in or just don't give a crap that you are already on the roundabout and they too special to wait a few secs.

    Should do commercials or PSA's on Correct Roundabout procedures.

      Be careful with people cutting in front of you on the roundabout. If they get onto the roundabout and you hit them, you could be at fault.

        In most states that is a failure to give way - a vehicle already in the roundabout has right of way, a vehicle "ducking in" is failing to give way. Having said that - defensive driving is always in your best interest, but doesn't change who is at fault in the eyes of the law - the person who didn't give way.

          I've heard of cases (second hand though) where that wasn't the case. Initially it was but overturned on appeal.

    It's interesting, because personally I have a much more positive view of roundabouts. I Sure, people who don't indicate properly and/or at all annoy me from time to time, but overall I really haven't had many issues with them. Unless the volume is too large, they tend to keep traffic flowing nicely and overall people try to do the right thing. I much prefer them over traffic lights. :)

    Am I missing something? It seems the rules are the same in EVERY STATE. Is this a APRIL fools day joke?

    They all say something to the effect of signal left when leaving the roundabout. Barely anyone actually does this. I moved to Geelong where quite frankly barely anyone indicates at all or uses lanes. I've never had so many people coming at me with their wheels on my side of the road before.

    being a currier in melbourne i only see problems on pension day, just sayyin

    I never understand why people think roundabouts are difficult. Treat it the same as any intersection, similar rules apply. If you are going straight ahead, you can use either lane. If you are turning right, use the right hand lane. If you are turning left, use the left hand lane. Indicate the same if you are using a normal intersection, except the difference being that you indicate left when leaving the roundabout before you leave the roundabout (not as you are leaving it or just after you having finished leaving it!) Remember these things and you are pretty well set (unless signs say otherwise of course).
    In a normal intersection, you can't turn right from a left hand lane, because you will more than likely be cutting somebody off and cause an accident, so I have no idea why people feel it is okay to do it on a roundabout. I wish common sense was more common!

    Last edited 01/04/14 9:31 pm

    Maybe you should just point out the differences in states because generally these rules seem pretty much the same across all states and they're all pretty straight forward. Most people use roundabouts well, they're not complicated. Unfortunately even "most" leaves a lot of idiots and selfish pig headed people.

    Blows my mind that you're allowed to change lanes whilst in the middle of a roundabout!

    Once you enter, you should not be allowed to change lanes, as it just causes all sorts of confusion and chaos.

      Agreed, most people cannot change lanes while going round safely and just end up cutting people off

      So if you enter a 2 lane round about on the inside. How do you exit with out changing lanes?

    Give way to vehicles on your right, or vehicles that might be approaching on your right. That's what I was taught 20 years ago, and I think it still holds true.

      That's not how the rules work on roundabouts, otherwise you end up with people giving way to the right for no good reason. The entire point of a roundabout is to allow traffic to flow, not for everybody to come to a stop to give way to traffic approaching on their right. If the car to your right isn't on the roundabout, and it's safe to enter, you may enter. It's a big circle, not a cross intersection - it's designed for that method.

        Thats exactly how its done but that is still giving way to your right.

          No, it isn't - if the car on your right isn't on the roundabout, you're not required to give way. It's a subtle difference but it's an important one. If you're entering the roundabout and the car to your right hasn't entered the roundabout, you don't stop and give way to them, you can enter after yielding to traffic that's already on the roundabout. That's different from a cross intersection where you'd have to yield to traffic approaching from your right. That's why roundabouts are designed how they are - they're designed to slow traffic (unlike a cross intersection), giving you more time to enter.

            To give way means to slow down or stop if necessary to avoid a collision and to wait until it is safe to proceed.

    In France there are two sorts of roundabouts:

    Type 1. Old style - In France and the rest of Europe even though they drive on the right hand side of the road they have a give way to the right rule. Up until 30 or so years ago roundabouts didn't have give way signs at the entrance so the car in the roundabout had to give way to the car entering.

    Type 2. New style - Roundabouts now have signs at the entrance that say "Vous n'avez pas prioritie" which means "You don't have priority" so the car entering the roundabout has to give way to cars in the roundabout, the same as here.

    What makes life interesting is that many of the old style roundabouts still exist, eg the 12 lane roundabout at the Arc d'Triomphe in Paris or 2 roundabouts in the centre of Juan les Pins on the Riviera (though the roundabout in the centre of Antibes, 1km away, is a type 2).

    Theoretically you should be warned by a yellow diamond that means that you have priority entering the roundabout but as you pass the next entrance you have to give way to entering vehicles but in many (most?) places they don't do this.

    You really have to watch every roundabout closely to make sure what type it is. If you don't see Vous n'avez prioritie watch out because you could be driving into a death trap.

    In the rest of Europe I don't think I have come across any type 1 roundabouts but I could be wrong.

    I just want to query the idea that "Roundabouts are regularly cited as being among the worst intersections for vehicle crashes each year." From what I've read, while there can be an increase in total number of accidents when a traffic light intersection is replaced by a roundabout intersection, the number of serious injuries/fatalities significantly decreases, due to the fact that the average speed at which accidents occurs is significantly less at roundabouts.

    So while you might have more scratch and dent accidents at roundabouts, you're much less likely to have the high-speed t-bone accidents that can occur at standard intersections.

      Nine of the ten worst traffic black spots in NSW (as of a few years ago) were roundabouts. Not entirely sure why, because what your saying intuitively makes sense. My guess is that lots of people enter roundabouts at speed too.

        Wow... that's really surprising. I'm from Vic, so I don't know much about NSW traffic conditions, but there must have been quite a change in the last few years, as I can't seem to find any on the current lists (thought I admit that I can't seem to find any official lists, just newspaper ones, eg. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/wreck-and-ruin-stalks-sydneys-traffic-traps-the-worst-accident-blackspots-in-the-city/story-fni0cx12-1226785339149).

        But either way, the only mention of roundabouts that I can find with respect to blackspots in NSW is the NSW Roads department talking about one of the methods of combatting accidents at blackspots bing installing "roundabouts at dangerous locations". (http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/doingbusinesswithus/lgr/downloads/programs/blackspotprogram.html)

          I believe they actually ended up installing lights on many dual carriage roundabouts (which totally defeats the purpose). Might explain the drop.

    Yep, still can't work out why so many people have problems with round-a-bouts... they are so simple.

    *sigh*

    The Madness Of Traffic Roundabouts Explained For Every State, is explained in the title...............unbelievable

    the roundabouts in QLD are horrendous! fucking lazy bastards use them all the time.
    they never indicate they are turning off the roundabout (not going straight thru) 90% ppl dont do it, and if they did traffic would be heaps smoother, as I have to wait till they exit now then go. if they indicated first 2 cars could of went thru the other side.

    then yesterday. Im going straight through one. im just cruising, next minute a truck decides that Im no longer required to live on Earth and not stop. missed my left rear quarter guard by 2 inches, after I had to floor it!

    Roundabouts are incredibly simple and intuitive.

    1. Everyone else on the road isn't paying enough attention, and isn't indicating appropriately, don't trust them to not hit you/cut you off (this rule actually applies as soon as you can see a road).

    2. Approach in the appropriate lane, as indicated by the giant arrows painted on the road. If you can't get this right throw away your license and apologise. Apologise to everyone.

    3. If you're not exiting in a straight line, indicate left or right.

    4. Look for a gap in traffic, keeping in mind point 1.

    5. Enter the roundabout without hitting anyone, if you fail this step get out of the car and walk away, just walk away and give up forever. You fucked up, you don't have right of way, and you don't deserve to own a car.

    6. As you reach your exit, and start turning the steering wheel left, extend you index finger so as to move the indicator stalk, indicating your intention to leave the roundabout.

    Not difficult.

    If you want to argue the point, and think this actually is difficult, please spend your time doing something that will be of more benefit to society, like cutting your license into tiny little pieces and setting your car on fire. Unless you think you might fuck that up through sheer incompetence too...

    Now explain the Magic Roundabout in the UK.

    when the rules say.. "driver has the right of way" does that mean the driver can stop in the middle of the road and because he has the right of way he can decide to let a pedestrian cross the road? happened to me today and i decided to stop for a lady with the pram and got a grumpy look and hand gestures in my rear view mirror from the driver behind me.

      i cant believe this ,,,sorry yes i can , what a great example of stupidity sorry but what safe thinking mother would push her pram through a roundabout in the first place? ,i wouldn't ,so why the fuck would you stop for a pedestrian and cause an accident ?

    There's a roundabout I go through occasionally that has a 'Stop' sign at one entrance, but 'Give Way' at the other three entrances. Some people seem to think that those at the Stop sign must give way to cars at the Give Way sign on the left, but the way I understand is that those at the Stop sign simply need to stop, then after that normal give way rules apply (give way to your right). Can anyone confirm/correct me on this?

    Why,at any point would you stop in the middle of a roundabout? If you stop you are more likely to cause an accident, with the possibility of you bing pushed and hitting the lady and pram and also injuring people in other cars! If you keep traffic flowing there will be a gap where she can cross safely, you're only making traffic worse for future pedestrians unable to cross

Join the discussion!

Trending Stories Right Now