Ask Lifehacker A Question And We'll Answer

Ask Lifehacker is one of our most popular features at Lifehacker, and we're always on the lookout for more questions. If you need advice on anything in your life -- from choosing the right phone plan to dealing with a weird software quirk to telling your partner what really happened -- send it in, and we'll get onto it (and dig out the relevant experts and sources as needed).

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To send in a question, simply use our contact form. If it helps explain the issue, you can attach a file as well. Ask away!


Comments

    Maybe a page set aside for asking questions that get answered by staff and commenters would get some traffic...?
    Here's one you could answer right here... The LH/Giz "user profile page" in Firefox, keeps telling me Firefox has blocked content that isn't secureDoesn't seem to be an easy fix there. However, Chrome is fine with it. Oh.. and no... I don't want to make Chrome my default browser... :)

    I actually just came on to send an Ask Lifehacker question!

    I did a while back and never got a response. Probably was a pain to answer.

    I've asked a few an always had a reply. Currently I'm researching which small-medium dog i can buy that is good for 5-10km runs to live in my townhouse with a relatively small-medium back yard.... might be a tough one to answer :-)

    Two questions asked and neither answered. One on phones and the other on printers.

    What do women want?

      Mel Gibson answered that in the movie "What Women Want" back in the year 2000.

      Last edited 01/03/14 12:27 am

    To be or not to be? THAT is the question.

    Last edited 01/03/14 12:28 am

    How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

    How does America print 10s of billions of additional dollars every year and not dilute the dollar value to that of a third world currency? How do they distribute and inject this physical money to businesses and people?

      Basically, and to vastly summarise, because the United States Dollar is the world currency, it is valued by the market. Very very few currencies attain this status. Perhaps only the Euro could challenge the Dollar in this regard. There's a specific term for this phenomenon, but I can't for the life of me remember it

    I sent in a question a few days ago (last Friday) and haven't seen it on the site, but several other AskLH posts have gone up - should I still be hoping you guys will get to it, or was it unanswerable?

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