Why Is There No Lunch/Dinner Equivalent To 'Brunch'?

Brunch is defined in the Macquarie Dictionary as "a midmorning meal that serves as both breakfast and lunch". What you won't find is a definition for a late afternoon meal that serves as both lunch and dinner. What gives?

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In today's hectic work culture, we'd argue that grabbing a late lunch/early dinner is much more common than indulging in a late breakfast. We regularly don't get around to eating lunch until 3pm, which usually means skipping dinner and having a light supper before bed. And yet, no word appears to exist for brunch's post meridiem equivalent.

We think it's time this vernacular omission was remedied. The obvious choices are 'Dunch' and 'Linner', but neither have the zippy caché of 'brunch'. Does anyone have a good suggestion for what to call the lunch/dinner replacement feast? Fire away in the comments section below!


Comments

    I skip Brunch and go straight to BRINNER! (Breakfast/Dinner)

      There's already a proper meal name for that, it's called Lunch

        Brinner is eating traditional breakfast foods at dinner time, not a mixture of Breakfast/Dinner.
        But I do agree that he could've worded it a little better.

    It's called afternoon tea

      Afternoon tea isn't really a substitute for lunch and dinner. It's usually something extra you slot in-between.

        True. Doesn't mean that brunch has to be a substitute for breakfast and lunch does it? Why can't you do all three

          Refer to the dictionary meaning above.

            There's already a term for the first meal of the day, it's called 'breakfast'. there's no need to use an extra term just because it happens slightly later than normal.

            I've always thought of brunch as a word for morning tea, but with savoury food - you don't have scones at brunch, but you'd absolutely have a bacon and egg roll. It helps set the correct expectations when you're inviting somebody out for a bite to eat.

      No it's not.

      Same as morning tea and brunch are 2 different things

    Don't Forget Dunch and Second Dunch!

    Just a reminder that some older people such as my grandparents refer to Dinner as Tea. This could justify the wording behind Afternoon Tea?

      And also they refer to Lunch as Dinner.

      I use the words "dinner" and "tea" interchangeably, but my dad uses the words "lunch" and "dinner" interchangeably, which often leads to confusing conversations.

    it Linner because thats the why the naming goes and big bang theory said so

    between dinner and breakfast is DinFast for the same reasons :)

    "linner"? See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLR-ZabrxuA skip to 6m20s

    Just had a look at Wikipedia... looks like they should be "Low/High tea" instead of afternoon tea/dinner.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_%28meal%29#Afternoon_tea_.2F_low_tea

      you are correct.. I highly suspect this is another US article that has been blindly posted on giz.AU.. Every aussie know's about morning/afternoon tea.. :)

    I just call it a late lunch or early dinner.

      This. It's generally, "late lunch", "early dinner" or sometimes "late lunch or early dinner" for me.

    It has been know for years that the correct term is Lupper.

      No, Lupper is half way between Lunch and Supper, which is more like a Late Linner than anythign else.

    I usually refer it as "shut up and go make me a sandwich woman!" (please take this humorously as this is an extremely non-serious comment)

    COME on guys....

    It's called 'elevenses'. ( I first heard this word whilst watching lord of the rings lol)

      No. Elevensies is actually a meal between Brunch and Lunch, if you consider Second Breakfast as Brunch.

    I think the traditional term is high tea, which traditionally includes savouries as well as sweets.

    betwinner. between lunch and dinner

      I'm fascinated by the thoughtful discussion due to the fact that my swarays begin always at two PM with grazing of foods until lights are out.
      I'm thinking a word call (Lun/ner)
      Lunch n dinner. What do you guys think?
      Cheers dianna.in lust with the desire to eat ... enjoy ing the sharing

    Breakfast is aptly named due to the breaking of the ~8 hour fast caused by being asleep.
    So if you missed your actual breakfast, lunch would then technically be breaking that fast, which is where brunch would come from.

    I guess that with the betwinner/dunch/linner situation, there isn't a long enough time period to consider it a fast; and most people would have some sort of snack in the afternoon anyway.

    I believe Hobbits have it right. They have Breakfast, Second Breakfast (which would be Brunch), Elevensies, Luncheon (Lunch), Afternoon Tea, Dinner, and Supper.

    I/my family just call it late lunch. Have it very often. I love eating my last meal between 3-4pm.

    This is exactly the kind of top-quality journalism that inspired me to sign up for the RSS feed in the first place.

    My understanding was that the order is breakfast, lunch and supper. "Dinner" is the biggest meal of the day, typically eaten in the evening, replacing supper. Therefore, yes, "Dinner" can be had at lunchtime.

    One of the ANAGRAMS for lunch+supper=punch plus
    I have been able to avoid acid indigestion and all need of antacids by never eating after 6pm.
    Breakfast 8am.....Brunch 10am.....Lunch Noon.....Punch+ 2pm.....Supper 4pm.....Fast 6pm to 6am

    Where I'm from, meals were always Breakfast, Dinner and then Supper. Dinner being anytime from 12-3pm and Supper after 5 or 6pm. But when going into a larger town or "city" people would generally call dinner lunch and Supper dinner...so if somebody invited you to lunch you pretty much knew around what time they were talking about. If somebody invited you to dinner, you just asked what time they had in mind. But I'm from a ranching and farming community in Montana. The only time we did brunch was on Easter Sunday. It just depends where you are from and what your upbringing was like.

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