Place Your Email's Conclusion First To Get More Responses

Nobody carefully reads every word of every email. To avoid getting lost in the shuffle, Inc. suggests ignoring what you learned in English class and starting every email with your conclusion.

Say you're trying to get your boss to move a department meeting to an offsite location. You might write an email like this:

Since it's often easier to generate creative ideas in unfamiliar locations, I'd like to suggest moving our meeting to the sushi restaurant across the street.

Instead, Inc. suggests writing more like this:

I think we should move our meeting to the sushi restaurant across the street, since it's often easier to generate creative ideas in unfamiliar locations.

Writing this way serves two purposes. One, it means your most important point will show up in the preview pane of most email clients. Second, it plants your central idea in the recipient's head right away, and lets your supporting points hammer it home. Check out Inc. for more email tips.

How To Write a Convincing Email [Inc.]


Comments

    I do something similar when writing documents (which is as seldom as I can make it). Say you need to write a 100 page document. Some people will want a very brief summary of the document to know if it is for them. Others will want more detail, without getting into the grittiness. Yet others will want all of the gore.

    The first 1% of my document is for those who want a summary; the first 10% are for those who want an overview; the 100% is for those who want the full details. Nobody has to search excessively to find a summary at the level they want it.

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