Do You Really Need To Say Thank You?

Is writing a quick "thank you" email good business etiquette, or just another frivolous piece of inbox clutter we could do without? In this piece, Peter Bregman of the Harvard Business Review examines how important thanking others via email can be.

Image attribution: vgstudio (Shutterstock)

John, the CEO of a sales organisation, sent an email to Tim, an employee several levels below, to compliment him on his performance in a recent meeting. Tim did not respond to the email.

About a week later, he was in John's office applying for an open position that would have been a promotion into a management role, when John asked him whether he had received the email. Yes, Tim said, he had. Why, John asked, hadn't he responded? Tim said he didn't see the need.

But Tim was wrong. John's email deserved, at the very least, a "thank you."

Tim didn't get the promotion. Was he passed over solely because he didn't thank John for the positive feedback? No. But was Tim's lack of response one piece of the Tim puzzle that convinced John he should choose a better candidate? Undoubtedly.

Before you accuse John of being trivial or over-sensitive, before you condemn his poor hiring judgment, consider what saying "thank you" represents.

On a basic level, it communicates that you received the email. While there's a lot of advice that discourages writing "thank you" emails because they contribute to email overload, I disagree. I answer every real email I receive because I want to avoid the recipient's "Did Peter get my email and what's he thinking?" angst. It takes three seconds to respond "thanks" and it completes the transaction initiated by the sender.

But an email that contains emotional content — like a compliment — deserves something longer: a real, thought-out "thank you" as opposed to a simple I-received-your-email "thank you". When you offer a real thought-out "thank you" to someone, you're acknowledging her effort, appreciating her thoughtfulness, recognising her intent, and offering feedback on the impact of her actions.

Still, it's more than that. Those things are rational, but saying "thank you" is mostly an emotional act. It connects one person to another. Saying "thank you" doesn't just acknowledge someone's effort, thoughtfulness, intent, or action. It acknowledges the person himself.

Acknowledging other people is a critical responsibility — perhaps the critical responsibility — of a great manager, especially in sales. Actually great manager is too high a bar. I might say it's the critical skill of a good manager but even that's understating it.

Acknowledging each other is our basic responsibility as human beings living in community with other human beings.

Go ahead and argue: We're all too busy at work and in life to spend time exchanging pleasantries. If John needs so much stroking, he can't possibly be a good CEO. He's out of touch with the digital age where no answers are the accepted norm. If Tim is doing his work well, that's all that matters. People are paid to do their jobs and they don't need to be thanked. Saying "thank you" to your CEO for a nice email is nothing more than brown-nosing.

I would disagree with all those arguments. It doesn't take long to say "thank you," but it does take caring. John is an excellent CEO, with a staff, board and shareholders who love him and for whom he delivers a high growth rate and excellent results. Not answering someone's communication — text or email or phone call — is not an accepted norm, it represents a fundamental breakdown in communication about which I often hear people complain. Tim might be good at certain aspects of his job but he's not "doing his work well" if he's not acknowledging the people around him. And, finally, saying "thank you" isn't brown-nosing, it's nice.

This all becomes more obvious if you take away the digital element. How would you feel if you complimented someone in person and he just walked away from you without saying anything? Weird, right?

Saying "thank you" — sincerely and with heart — feels good. Not just to the person receiving it, but also to the person offering it. And that's part of work too. It's hard to remember, as we process our hundredth email, that behind each message is a person..

Tim made a mistake by not appreciating John's effort or acknowledging his sentiment. I don't want to make that same mistake.

Do You Really Need to Say Thank You? [Harvard Business Review]

Peter Bregman is a strategic advisor to CEOs and their leadership teams. His latest book is 18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done.


Comments

    Thank you for this article.

    I tend to use manners in all areas of business (mainly procurement related), because I believe it is more proffessional and also the next time you do business with that particular person you have built a rapport with them and they will be more inclined to make sure you get what you want, and or go out of their way to help you.

    It is a dilemma, as I have found sending such 'thank you' messages end up creating a negative perception ie the brown-nosing argument. And this is feedback FROM managers/bosses I've had in the past.

    While good manners is something which should be practiced, it can quite often not be tolerated in the workplace. If a workplace does want to encourage good manners, such as the thank you email, etc., they need to communicate those expectations, not just let the employees find out on their own.

    I don't mind getting a 'thank you' email back - if nothing else it means you have proof that the person has received the email should you ever need it.

    I'm in two minds, when i close off a support issue, i sometimes get a thank you back, which reopens the ticket, which while its nice to hear a thank you, i then have to go in and close off the ticket again, being sure they don't get sent another email.

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