Hacker Rank, The Social Networking Site For Fun-Loving Ne'er-Do-Wells

Facebook may test your patience from time to time, but unless you're engaged in the social networking site's multitude of interactive time wasters, there's not much to do but post photos and status updates. If you're the problem-solving type after a deeper online social experience, the newly-minted Hacker Rank might be for you.

"A fun social platform for hackers to solve interesting puzzles, build quick hacks, code game bots and collaborate to solve real-world challenges," states the site's byline, positioned above an interactive, OS X-styled Terminal window. Hacker Rank is currently in beta and in order to get involved, you'll need to figure out a logic puzzle.

Going by an earlier TechCrunch article, the site previously allowed users to solve the challenge before signing up. This has since been removed and now you must first login via the pseudo-console, at which point you'll be able to put your brain power to work.

Despite the "hacker" moniker, you won't have to dust off your scripting abilities to get involved; the challenge simply requires you to remove x candies from a predetermined pool, with you and the AI taking alternating turns. Whoever takes the final candy is the winner.

Is there a market for a social networking site that includes a higher degree of thought than figuring out how you're going to tag your awkward drunken party photos? I think there's a "yes" in there somewhere.

Hacker Rank [via TechCrunch]

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Comments

    Taking candy from a computer by hand is always a viable option-- but scripting ability will result in more candy.

    Yeah, the challenge isn't to solve the puzzle presented. The challenge is to write a script to solve the puzzle enough times that you get to the leader board. The frustrating thing is that if the computer player was decently written - there would only be 429 valid starting numbers and 2555 would be the maximum collectible number of candies. The high score board shows that the computer player isn't actually clever enough to win unless the player loses.

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