Share Only What You Need To In A Job Interview

The purpose of job interviews are for both parties to get an idea of whether it's a good fit between the company hiring and the job candidate. Unfortunately, sometimes interviewers can be tricky in the way they weed out candidates.

Photo by bpsusf

Financial site LearnVest interviewed hiring managers across the US and found some controversial methods they used to get information about applicants or use information against candidates. For example, one hiring manager places photos of children on his desk — photos that aren't of his own kids but of his nieces and nephews — to prompt candidates to get them talking about their families, so he can weed those out. Another admits to checking for wedding bands, even though discriminating against marital status is a huge no-no.

As disheartening as this article slideshow is, you'll find some good tips here too (the biggest one being not to disclose personal information more than you need to). One clever idea: If you don't want to disclose your previous salary, you can say you signed a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) about your salary.

11 Things Hiring Managers Won't Tell You [LearnVest]


Comments

    When do employers have the right to inquire about your health?

    Obviously only relevant for North America. In Australia, we're regulated to the eyeballs against discriminatory hiring practices, That's not to say it doesn't happen but by and large we're fairly safe here. Certainly ageism doesn't seem to be as prevalent in the workplace as it is in USA. Also, it's almost impossible to apply for a (white collar) job except through an online process. Many employers simply refuse to accept your application by post; the assumption probably being that if you can't operate a computer to send your application, you don't have the required skills.

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