Don't Take To Your iPhone With WD-40

We recently pointed to a suggestion that WD-40 was a useful way of loosening a stuck iPhone home button. Several readers highlighted out potential downsides of that approach, and one in particular sticks out: the solvents in WD-40 will ruin the internals of the iPhone if they get inside.

As Alex notes over at Gizmodo, a report on iMore highlights that not only is liquid in general bad for your iPhone, WD-40 could dissolve the plastic on the home button and other internal plastics as well. Looks like the best fix for a stick button is, alas, a Genius Bar trip.

Warning: WD-40 will not fix your Home button [iMore via Gizmodo]


Comments

    What about the old favourite Isopropyl Alcohol?

    WD-40 might not be a good idea, but Isopropyl alcohol is. No harm if it comes into contact with the electronics as long as the purity is high enough.

      True, but what would be the point of that? There's no lubricant in isopropyl, so the most you could hope for is it dissolving glue or solidified foreign substance.

      (WD-40 has lubricant dissolved in the solvent, so once the solvent evaporates you're still left with lubricant.)

        Plastics seldom need lubricating - if lubrication IS required, than the component shouldn't have been made of plastic in the first place.

        If the button isn't functioning properly, it's more likely dirty. That being the case, isopropyl alcohol will disolve whatever contaminant is there before evaporating.

    Wouldn't it be a good idea to edit your previous article saying "DON"T DO IT! READ THIS ARTICLE FIRST? In big capital letters?

    You can purchase "Electrical Contact Cleaner" from any electronics store, which will fix any issues with a dirty contact. WD40 is not a contact cleaner.

      Um, it's not the contact that needs cleaning...

    so wd-40 didn't work.... so sticky tape than, that should solve the problem

    What do I do with my damaged iPhone now? :P

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      Disclaimers like these never stand up under testing in court. You can't just deny all responsibility like this. It's like those disclaimers in car parks; they do have a duty of care and you can claim against them if your car is damaged.

      Really, the use of WD-40 is so obviously wrong that printing the original advice shows how little fact checking goes on for stories like this.

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    So what's going to happen to my now damaged iPhone now?

    if the article told you that running over your iphone with a car will fix the button problem, would you do it?

    anyone with half a brain would've known this was a bad idea.

      Well insaulting people is not the problem, most people would not know what WD40 is made out of or what it would do to the insides of a phone.

      How in god's name did Lifehacker think this was a good idea in the first place, and what is it going to do about my damaged iPhone now.

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