Make Grooves In Your Cutting Board For Easier Cleanup

Do you always end up with crumbs or meat juices all over your counter when you use your cutting board? If so, try this clever hack: Make channels in the wood using a router table or other woodworking tools.

Duane Davis offers this tip on IKEA Hackers for cutting bread or cake. He cut 1/2 inch channels spaced 1/2 inch apart, sanded, and applied food-safe oil to the boards in the end. I have a (bought) version that has just one big groove running along the edges of the cutting board, for the same purpose, so you could also do that design instead if you wish. Either way, now you can keep your counters a little more mess-free.

Cutting Board for Crumbs [IKEA Hackers]


Comments

    If you cut or rout slots like this into your timber cutting board, don't use it for meat! you will effectively give the blood and juices access to the end grain allowing it to seep into the board. This is great for crumbs but not good at all for blood!!

    I agree with Eccentric. Learn how to use and knife and board properly. Using this method is really unhygienic. I'm sure it would not be allowed in any commercial kitchen.

    Eccentric. . . thats a myth.

    From here: http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/5-2-2006-95011.asp

    Researchers at the Institute intentionally contaminated both wooden cutting boards and plastic ones with all types of bacteria that cause food poisoning. They then tested the boards regularly, without washing or touching them, to see what happened to the bacteria. Surprisingly, all the bacteria on the wooden board dried off within three minutes. On the plastic board, the bacteria not only remained alive but actually multiplied overnight.

    The explanation for the dramatic results is that wood has a natural bacteria-killing property, which plastic does not. Because of the capillary action of dry wood, germs quickly disappear beneath the surface of the board, where they die quickly. The exposed area on top of the board is free from microbes. In contrast, bacteria just sit on the hard surface of a plastic cutting board, ready to attack whatever food is placed on the board next.

      That's really good to know - Thanks!

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