Avoid Bicycle Crashes With A DIY Distance Warning System

In an effort to make bike riding safer, DIYer Ben Heck builds this proximity sensor for bikes, that warns when you're getting too close to cars or other objects on the road.

The final product is similar to the sensors in your car that beep when you get too close to something — except Heck's design works the entire time you're riding, so that you won't get hit by any opening doors or bushwhacking ninjas. Check out the video above to see how he puts it all together with an Arduino, some ping sensors, and a few LED lights.

A Bicycle Mod for Two [The Ben Heck Show]


Comments

    In other news: Common sense reveals that using sensors that have been under development for millions of years - eyes - work well for finding things to avoid running into.

      My thoughts exactly, evolution or god (whatever) has given me two perfectly good sensors called eyes.

      The best thing about them, is I can take them with me where ever I go and use them for anything I damn well please for.

        And now you can have a few more sensors, just in case there's a situation where the two you were born with aren't sufficient. Besides, a little redundancy when it comes to road safety can't be a bad thing.

          I'll take my common sense and natural drive for self preservation any day over some cheap sensor.

            But this isn't replacing any of that, this is in addition to that.

            Some people just like to whinge.

    Night blindness + no light on front of bike (back only) + black wheelie bin + no traffic lights = me supermanning a couple of metres down the road

      Baa: you'd rather put sensors on your bike than oh, a decent headlight? O_o

    It's the cars that need the sensors the most.

    This idea will NOT save you from car doors suddenly being flung open illegally by drivers.

    I agree with Alex - use your eyes! Bike riders have to stay alert at all times and constantly watch everything on the road in front of them. Car drivers should too but often fail to for various psychological (refer to studies on how we process information) and technological reasons (too busy on the phone etc.)

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