Nintendo Cuts $100 From Price Of 3DS

At the end of March, when the Nintendo 3DS launched, the official price for the device was $349.95 and the cheapest standalone price was $288. Barely four months later, Nintendo has hacked the price rather dramatically, reducing the list price to $249.95.

Gaming isn't Lifehacker's core focus, but we're mentioning this because it demonstrates yet again how being an early adopter with technology can end up being expensive. We've seen particularly extreme examples with Android tablets, which have routinely fallen to half or a third of their release price in the same sort of time frames. The 3DS drop isn't quite as pronounced, but if I was a kid who had saved their pocket money to buy, I might feel disappointed. Yes, I'd have four months of gaming and some playground kudos, but $100 is still a lot of money. Nintendo is offering existing owners a bunch of game downloads as partial compensation (10 each from its retro NES and Gameboy/Gameboy Advance catalogues), but that's only really effective compensation if those are games you wanted.

Nintendo 3DS Australian Price Slashed: Now $249.95 [Kotaku]


Comments

    If no-one buys it on release day the price won't come down, they'll just stop selling it. I would like to see a breakdown of the early adopters, from the people I know who bought the iPad 2 it was almost exclusively disposable income types. Different market to the 3DS, but I suspect it would be the same (expensive items are usually restricted to birthdays or Christmas for kids - at least that was the way it was when I was a kid).

    I would've bought a 3DS at (or around) launch had I not been so disenchanted with Nintendo that I'm boycotting them...

    Just read the price in Japan was reduced by 40%. Also Nintendo's full profit forecast is down 82%.

    I remember getting Waverace 64 for free when they reduced the price of the N64 not long after launch.

    I reckon it was poorly marketed. I have yet to see a working one on display in any shop, and I was keen to see it in action.

Join the discussion!

Trending Stories Right Now