Welcome To Earth Month On Lifehacker

We're no strangers to offering hints on reusing stuff, saving power and avoiding needless waste here on Lifehacker. But throughout April, along with our sibling sites Gizmodo, Kotaku and the Sugar network, we'll be offering daily tips and features looking at how you can live your life in a more impact-free way. Welcome to Earth Month.

Picture by Steve Cadman

Regular readers might recall me dumping on the concept of Earth Hour recently, precisely because it tends to involve people making a brief token gesture and then carrying on as before. We'll be concentrating on advice that you can use in the long term to make permanent changes.

At the same time, we're not going to get involved in arguments over the extent of global warming — not because the science in this area isn't actually clear, but because even people who don't believe it would have a hard time arguing that we have infinite space, fossil fuel reserves or supplies of water. Whatever your political stripe, there's not many downsides to reducing your impact, even if it's just the simple cheapskate argument for saving money.


Comments

    Apologies for being negative - this is a great idea - but there just seems something wrong with using an image of a plastic globe as an intro to a month about reducing your impact on Mother Earth! How bout a real picture of the planet... something like: http://www.istockphoto.com/search/text/planet_earth/source/basic/?#3b15ec8
    #therealthing

    If this is anything like "Earth Hour" then "No Thanks!"

      I don't mean to sound snarky, but did you actually read the article beyond the blurb? Because the second paragraph starts with a link to a previous post criticising Earth Hour.

      And on that note, I actually have my own Earth Hour every night. About eight to ten Earth Hours, in fact.

      I call it sleep.

    David - perhaps the icon of a plastic Earth is apt when you consider the lifestyle of the bulk of western society!

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