How To Make A Perfectly Poached Egg

The perfectly poached egg is soft and runny on the inside but firm on the outside, like a little egg present. Don't be intimidated if you've never poached an egg—making this heavenly breakfast (or brunch or dinner) treat is easy.Photo by jo-h

A poached egg is somewhere between a very runny fried egg and a boiled egg. It has the best of both worlds, but requires some skill to perfect. The kitchn offers 6 tips for the poaching process, including an apparently highly debatable process of creating a vortex in the water before you drop the egg in. What tips do you have for making perfect poached eggs?

Tips and Tricks for Poaching Eggs [the kitchn]


Comments

    I agree with the website. Shallow water not quite simmering slowly put the egg in and then let it cook. I do not do the vortex thing because it never works for me. A teaspoon or two of vinegar can help sometimes too.
    You can also poach an egg in a mug in the microwave too but it is fiddly to get the times right.

    Vortex works but only for one egg. This is not an option if you want to do multiple eggs - they just glue themselves together and timing to 4 minutes is difficult. The best tip I ever saw was to use to large spoons to bring the egg together as soon as they have been lowered into the water. Works for multiple eggs.

    Instead of vinegar or the vortex method, the technique taught to me by my dad has always worked best for me. Simply place the egg in the water and gently roll it around for 20-30 seconds, take it out of the water with a spoon and crack it into the water carefully. The slightly cooked white around the outside of the egg holds it all together.

    Bugger the vortex etc. Crack the egg into some cling wrap, bring up the ends and twist it together, chuck that into the pot of boiling water. Nil mess, perfect egg. :)

      That was on masterchef, but you need to use commercial grade cling wrap, regular wrap supposedly isn't the best to use.

        Used the standard stuff at home, just don't let it touch the sides.

    I've found that a frypan with enough water to float the egg in, but not too much more is ideal. Added to this is the remnants of the previous evenings bottle of champagne. Works best with vintage french, and of course is a romantic meal !

    it's simple, use egg rings in a fry pan and fill the water to the top of the rings.

      Thats how i do it.... works like a charm

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3eLeDNK1fo

    Best method: Use ridiculously fresh eggs. Straight out of the chicken if you can. They'll poach without any trickery whatsoever.

    Failing that: use eggs straight from the fridge. The older the eggs are, the more vinegar you'll need to add to the water.

    Egg rings is foolproof method but of course they do not look as good as free form.

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