Quiet Tap Drip With A String

If you've got a leaky tap, that drip-drip-drip sound can drive you insane — especially at night time. Here's an easy way to keep it quiet.

Photo by sfxeric.

Leaky taps can be difficult to discover during the day, but if you lay down to bed and realise your tap is in need of a plumber, you'll need a quick fix to get you through the night. In addition, homes in warmer areas aren't usually protected against the occasional cold snap, and purposely letting your tap drip can keep those pipes from freezing until the weather gets warm again. Either way, you'll want to quiet it down when you go to bed at night.

This is just about one of the simplest home fixes we can think of: all you need is a bit of string. Tie it around the head of your faucet and let it hang down so the end of the string touches the bowl of the sink. The water will cling to the string and not make any sound as it drips down to the drain! Of course, it's not an actual fix, so if your tap is dripping against your will, you'll want to call a plumber and get it fixed.

Tie a String on Your Faucets to Stop the Drip [Re-Nest]


Comments

    By the fires of Zeus, that's brilliant...!

    No, seriously, it is.

    That's a temporary solution that will become a permanent fixture for those who would consider this a smart idea.

    It's not that hard to fix a leaky tap.

    Sure there will be those that just seem unfixable, but it will be worth your trouble to try and fix those leaky taps yourself.

      Hi John,

      I just spent 2 months trying to get my landlord to send out someone to fix this very problem. The string idea would have saved me a lot of frustration in the interim.

      Thats a rather cynical remark, John.

      I think its a great idea, but who would want to put up with a string dangling in the basin for longer than is necessary??

      Plus, if I was away, I would not expect my better half to have to try and fix the tap herself, and this trick would keep her sane til I returned to save the day ;)

    Tap washers do cost all of 50 cents?

    The only benefit would be for non rubber washer taps such as, single arm types. They use ceramic washers which can be non serviceable & that means replacing a whole tap worth $200+.

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