Five Ways To Not Suck At PowerPoint

It's hard enough standing in front of a crowd delivering a presentation. To ease the worry, here are five mistakes that are easily avoidable when creating a PowerPoint presentation.

It's easy to blame PowerPoint for boring presentations, but designer Jesse Desjardins suggests that more often than not, the speaker's to blame, not the tool. In Desjardins' presentation (embedded below), he outlines five common presentation design mistakes that can be easily avoided, along with suggestions on how you might do so.

While it's important to build your presentation so your audience isn't stuck reading bullet point after bullet point, and instead are open to larger graphics that can be seen from even the farthest rows back, it really comes down to preparation. In the end, it's all about preparation. In fact, Desjardins suggests:

An outstanding 1-hour presentation takes 30 hours or more of prep time.

That may seem extreme, and for most of us it is (you won't always have time to make an outstanding presentation), but it does underscore that a good presentation requires a lot of time.

You Suck At PowerPoint [Jesse Dee]


Comments

    This guy's Slideshare profile is a thing of wonder. I'm in awe.

    Trying to set up Slideshare Karaoke for the office - we grab an awesome preso and present it as if it were our own. I'm hoping it will inspire a new way of developing our own presentations

    This comedy video of what not to do in powerpoint presentations is a pretty useful and funny resource: http://www.jackcola.org/blog/30-what-you-should-not-do-when-creating-powerpoint-presentations

    Our CEO is actually a pretty switched on guy for design. When he knocks up a slideshow for personal or non-work use, it follows all the rules here. However for company use, we need the corporate logo on every slide in every presentation we have, to essentially drill into viewers who we are. about 25% of the usable space is wasted that way.

    By the same token, he absolutely insists on large header and footer images on every email we send externally (most clients don't display images by default now), and we we have a splash page for our newly-redesigned corporate website.

    When was the last time you saw a half-decent company with a splash page for their site?

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