Use An Ubuntu Live CD To Test Your PC's Memory

If your PC has been experiencing strange system crashes, or even the dreaded blue screen of death, it's worth running some tests to check your system hardware. Luckily the Ubuntu Live CD has some tools built right in.

We've already shown you how to use the Ubuntu Live CD to do things like recover data or scan your Windows PC for viruses, but over at the How-To Geek site (my home away from Lifehacker), writer Trevor points out that the Ubuntu Live CD includes a RAM testing tool by default, and you can even use some CPU burn-in tools to give your PC a thorough test cycle — handy in a pinch if all you have access to is an Ubuntu install disc.

To access the memory testing tool, just drop the CD in the drive and use the Test memory feature from the boot menu. To access the CPU burn-in tools, you'll need to pop open the Synaptic package manager and install the cpuburn package. Check out the full tutorial for a step-by-step guide to testing your PC.

Diagnose PC Hardware Problems with an Ubuntu Live CD [How-To Geek]


Comments

    @thevpuli Testing the RAM by removing one stick at a time won't help you if you are having intermitant problems.

    I installed Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx yesterday. I ran the live cd to repartition the hard drive so that I could boot it in its own partition alongside an NTFS partition with Windows 7. At 320GB it took a little over four hours to complete.

    The MBR for windows 7 was at that point destroyed and after using another computer to trawl the internet to look for the source of the problem, I gave up and just booted from the windows 7 DVD to repair it.

    After doing this, I booted back into Ubuntu and tried to mount one of my 1TB hard drives, which promptly stopped working. Booting back into windows again, the drive detected but stated itself as having no filesystem and no data. I spent four hours searching for a solution, eventually installing ntfs support and re-scanning the drive. This was the second time that trying to use an external drive with ubuntu caused such an error.

    Thats how Ubuntu's file tools helped me.

    That being said, with those problems resolved rather than hanging like bricks over my head, I absolutely adore the way the new release is put together. I just wanted to state that its not always such a fantastic thing to use when you dont understand the specifics of how different operating systems deal with data.

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