Halve Your Beer Tab By Brewing Your Own

If you view brewing your own beer as an esoteric hobby reserved for true beer geeks, you might want to take a second look based on savings alone. Brewing your own can slash your beer budget while increasing the quality.

Photo by jronaldlee.

Over at the financial and frugality centered blog Wise Bread they share their experience brewing their own beer. On top of thoroughly enjoying the process they saved a significant amount of money. They were drinking mid-level beer and switching to home brewing saved them roughly 50%.

A standard batch of homebrew is five gallons, which should make more than 48 bottles, or two cases of beer. At our usual $US22 to $US25 per case, that would be more than $US44 to $US50 worth of beer. The ingredients and consumable supplies for the first batch cost $US31, so this represents a $US13 to $US19 savings on two cases. As you can see, it will take several batches to make back our initial capital outlay for equipment and supplies.

If they were buying even higher quality beer they'd be saving even more. Put the savings to other uses or funnel it right back into your beer-brewing operation to try out new flavors and equipment. Check out the full post for additional information and beer brewing resources. Have your own experience home brewing? Let's hear about it in the comments.

Homebrewed Beer: Make Your Own and Save Money [Wisebread]


Comments

    I brew my own beer, with a few mates at U-Brew-It. You get all the cost benefits, but you're using proper brewing equipment and quality ingredients. Also, it means you don't have to worry about temperature management or having to find a heap of space for your home brew.

    You have to make 6 slabs at a time, so unless you have plenty of fridge space you better do it with one or two mates.

    There are 150 different recipes and I haven't had a bad one yet.

      U-Brew-It has worked well for me too. It removes some of the small risks of doing it with less-than-brilliant temperature control at home.

      The only additional criterion that we apply is to only make beer styles that are expensive to buy locally. We don't try and recreate cheap slabs of local beer - little point given what is available on regular 'special'.

      You also have the slightly pricier option of putting your output into cans (500ml)!

    I've been brewing my own beer for about 20 years now, I make around 4-5 batches a year, with a yield of 50-odd stubbies each, for an outlay of around $15 per batch. Money very well spent! If you do it right, it'll be better that any commercial beer.

Join the discussion!