From The Tips Box: Mouse Dirt, Credit Spending, Resumé Sending

Readers offer their best tips for preventing mouse-scratching noises, curbing credit card spending, sending updated resumes, and increasing your knowledge with Wikipedia.

About the Tips Box: Every day we receive boatloads of great reader tips in our inbox, but for various reasons — maybe they're a bit too niche, maybe we couldn't find a good way to present it, or maybe we just couldn't fit it in — the tip didn't make the front page. From the Tips Box is where we round up some of our favourites for your buffet-style consumption. Got a tip of your own to share? Email it to tips at lifehacker.com.au.

Tape Paper to the Bottom of your Mouse to Stop Dirt from Scratching

Ignignokt shows us how he kept his mouse from making scratching noises against his desk:

I do love my multitouch Magic Mouse, but dragging it across a smooth surface prone to dirt and debris caused an infuriating scratching noise every few minutes, forcing me to drag the undersurface across my pants vigorously to clean it, tripping my various hot corners.

In keeping with my previous index card convenience, I ingeniously punched a hole through an aforementioned index card for the tracking laser and crudely taped it to the bottom of the mouse. The result: a completely silent Magic Mouse, save for a soft swishing sound.

Spurred on by my success, I broke out the scissors and X-acto knife and swiftly made a new card, with neatly trimmed edges and holes to satisfy my inner Jonathan Ives.

Stick Post-It Notes to your Credit Cards to Curb Spending

Photo by The Consumerist.

David shares an easy tip that helps keep the credit card bills down:

I keep a small post-it note on the back of my credit card that covers the magnetic strip. The post-it has a reminder that keeps me from buying things I don't need. The act of removing the post-it when it's time to charge something puts one more step between me and excess spending.

If you really want to ramp it up, tally the number of days you can go without using your credit card on the post-it. Every tally can represent one more day you've gone without incurring more debts and thus, reenforces good spending habits one step at a time.

Unlike keeping the card out of your wallet or in a block of ice, this method has the benefit of allowing you to use it when you're in a pinch.

Send Links to Your Resumé Instead of the Document Itself

Photo by Bri Lehman.

stillinbeta tells us a great way to make sure potential employers always have the most updated version of your resumé:

I have a little résumé-related tip. I'm pretty young, so my résume is pretty dynamic. When I email someone about a job offer, I don't attach my actual résumé. Instead, I give a link to a place on my website where the résumé can be found. That way, if I update by résumé (whether for spelling or a new accomplishment or a new job), the document will stay updated. Sometimes résumés can sit in a potential employer's inbox for weeks, so I like knowing they'll always have the most up to date version.

Set Your Homepage to Wikipedia Random for your Daily Dose of Knowledge

darkishdave has a neat tip for increasing your knowledge on any subject:

To set your homepage to a random Wikipedia Page, open up your browser settings and insert this URL as the homepage: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Random


Comments

    stillinbeta, many recruiters use inhouse databases to search relevant terms in their own stored resumes. You may not come up in these searches if you only send a link. Perhaps consider sending both.

    Just a tip.. the resume tip may work nicely in a magical computerland, where every little worker bee from the boss to the secretary has extensive skills in the arcane and complicated art of clicking a link in an email. I assure you this is not a skill reflected in the world at large!

    I don't know how many call backs I have received to ask me can I attach a cv and some examples of my work... um, it is attached.. see the link.. a link is a blue underlined word.. right next to the bit of the letter that says please click this link to see examples of my work.. oh, you didn't read the letter.. well, I suppose I can attach it but it is very big, and I have already built a website.. yes, I will show it to you when I come in for an interview........

    ok, so it does work, but maybe not the way you might think.

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