Top 10 Ergonomic Upgrades For Your Workspace

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Top 10 Ergonomic Upgrades For Your Workspace

It’s easy to forget about your body’s needs when you’re deep into your work or the net — until your body offers a painful reminder. Save your physical shell some strain with these cheap, customisable ergonomic workspace upgrades.

Photo by IMG_3771 on Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

10. Elevate your laptop to eye level

top 10 laptop standsDIY pipe stand

9. Mix up your positions with a standing desk

handcrafted setup$US20 modelsurface on a storage racktreadputer

8. Get better sleep support

Lifehack.org’s pain and posture basicsPhoto by james.thompson.Original post

7. Invest in a real mouse and keyboard

6. Align yourself properly with your computer

5. Build your own ergonomic desk from scratch

make an actually ergonomic desk from medium-density fibreboardOriginal post

4. Use exercises to ward off RSI

You can do a lot to prevent stress and pain in your hands working at a computer all day, but you’ll almost inevitably have bad days full of overly long hours, and, over the long haul, risk sidling yourself with repetitive strain injury (RSI). Percussionist David Kuckhermann knows a thing or two about repetitive wrist and forearm strain, as does RSI expert Sherry Smith, and they both recommend and demonstrate a few simple exercises that can ward off and heal the effects of working your hands into knots. (Original post)

3. Fine-tune your desk spacing

ergonomic workspace planner

2. Use software enforcers

AntiRSITimeoutWorkrave

1. Go easy on your eyes

EyeDefendereasy eye fixesslightlyusing a darker desktop theme

What improvements, big or small, have made the greatest difference in your workspace health? Pass on the knowledge in the comments.

Comments

  • This sounds a little facetious but I’d probably avoid the “ergonomic” term completely. Let’s be realistic; there is nothing “ergonomic” about remaining in the same position for long periods of time. If improving the “ergonomics” of your workspace results in you remaining in that space for longer periods (as I suspect it’d probably do for too many of us) you’re back where you started.

    Of your points I think 9. Mix up your position is probably the most important. Of course how much you can do that depends on your workplace. Failing that, the points above are useful and although seemingly obvious I still hear of people working at a 45 degree angle to their monitor complaining about neck pains!

    My personal preference is to use a laptop and stand, sit, lie, squat, cross-legged sit, etc. Basically changing position frequently.

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