How To Upgrade From Leopard To Snow Leopard

So you've checked out the good stuff and decided to take the plunge to Snow Leopard. Upgrading is mind-numbingly easy, but in case you wouldn't mind a little hand-holding, here's our quick and simple UltraNewb guide to upgrading from Leopard to Snow Leopard.

Prep Your Mac

If you haven't already, be sure to prep your Mac for the upgrade. In a nutshell, that means doing a little housekeeping (no need bringing old, unnecessary clutter into your shiny new upgrade), backing up data, and choosing your upgrade path. For our purposes, we're going to assume your upgrade path is a straight Leopard to Snow Leopard upgrade, though a clean install is always nice if you really want to get that fresh start feeling.

One thing to note: You'll need at least 5GB of free space to upgrade using the basic Leopard-to-Snow-Leopard upgrade path. If you don't have enough free space (my laptop didn't), try an application like GrandPerspective to identify large files you don't need and free up the necessary space.

Install Snow Leopard

This process is exceedingly simple, but as I said above, sometimes it's nice to watch the canary in the coal mine so you know what to expect. So, here goes:

1. Insert the Snow Leopard DVD: Just insert your Snow Leopard DVD, open it up, and double-click Install Mac OS X.

2. Click Continue and Get Installing: At the first screen, hit Continue. You'll see a licence agreement; read away and agree to continue.

3. Choose Your Install Drive: The Snow Leopard install disc will automatically determine your install drive if it's obvious, but if it's not—or if you don't want to install to the drive it automatically selected—hit the Show All Disks button to select a different install drive. Otherwise, just click Install.

4. Enter Your Password: This is the point of no return. Assuming you're all prepped, just enter your password and take the plunge to Snow Leopard.

5. Wait At this point, you're pretty much done. (We told you it was easy.) Grab a cold drink, put on some music, and wait. The installation will start as soon as you enter your password. On my computer, the install process went on for about 15 minutes, then restarted, then continued for another 50-odd minutes. (It hung for at least 10 minutes when it said "Less than a minute" remaining, but I've got an old-ish MacBook Pro, so yours may be a bit faster.)

6. Enjoy Snow Leopard: When it completes, your computer should restart once more. When it starts up, you should be greeted with Snow Leopard's intro video (it's actually the same welcome video as you saw when you upgraded to Leopard, which doesn't help Apple's case against people who consider Snow Leopard little more than a service pack). You'll then see the setup assistant. If you've taken the straight upgrade path, chances are you don't need this at all (I cancelled rather than sit through another MobileMe pimp session.) You can always run the Migration Assistant later if you need to. (/Applications/Utilities/Migration Assistant.app).

Now that you've upgraded and had a chance to spend a little time poking around, let's hear what you think about the cold kitty in the comments.


Comments

    Step 1 should be Backup Backup and Backup again! I recommend making a bootable clone with something like SuperDuper.

      Yup, backing up is essential, and Super Duper's gone to v2.6 to be more compatible with the cold kitty...

    I lost all my Mail addresses, mailboxes, content, ll my Safari bookmaorks are gone. This really sucks.

    I have brought my Snow leopard upgrade first thing today morning from Street wise for $35.
    Backup up my data and updated all went fine. Now time to play around so far no issues.

    Just upgraded, went without a hitch in less than an hour, not one issue and BootCamp is just fine too. The speed is noticeable (only in parts) and Safari is a lot snappier.

    Updated...

    all goes well

    no lost mail
    no lost pref (but I use Opera)
    more than 7GB space gain

    quicktimeX first impression? I prefer the previous.

    nice...

    seems really faster ...

    GOOD

    I have upgraded three machines now and on at least two of them, setup assistant has popped up days after the initial upgrade, running for a second time with no option to turn it off. In each case, the triggering event was to log in as the admin user. In one of these cases, Setup Assistant required the admin credentials but wouldnt accept the current password. It finally accepted a 6 month old password. By the time it was done, my computer had been renamed, with a "-2" appended to the original computer name.

    First impression: the setup tool needs a lot of work

    I updated from Tiger to SnowLeopard on my 2 year old iMac, apart from a few glitches the upgrade seems OK. I did the upgrade to install iLife 9, well guess what it won't load unless my system is 10.5.5.... Funny, I have 10.6.2 now. I assume that Apple has a bug to prevent this install if your haven't purchased Leopard initially. So I thought I would do a full install of SL by wiping the hard drive, install the system, then install iLife 9. Well the system loads and updates, but still iLife will NOT install, same issue....looking for 10.5.5 compatibility. iLife 8 still operates by drag n drop from backup system, (drag apps, themes and user preferences to like folders on Snow).

    Next I tried to install a new system from Apple install disks of 10.6 with iLife 9 that was supplied with a brand new iMAc LED. Well guess what....it will not load to the computer (this model iMac) WTF!

    Can anyone advise me what to do, I want to use iLife 9 on my Mac, maybe I could drag n drop from the new Mac to load.

    It should be noted that to install the SnowLeopard ( OS 10.6 ) you need a INTEL Mac and the drive will be formated by the installer using the gui 32/64 bit format.

    In other words you can not simply update from the previously installed Leopard ( 10.5 ).

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