Aussies Addicted To External Hard Drives

There are lots of options if you're looking to make a backup -- burning to DVD, copying to a USB key, pushing everything into the cloud -- but it seems that Australians are particularly keen on external hard drives.

"For some reason in Australia, we see the largest quantity of external hard drives," said Adrian Briscoe, local managing director for Kroll Ontrack, which performs recovery services when drives go bad. I'd hazard a guess that slow connection speeds and data caps are one reason why cloud-based solutions aren't more popular; a more cynical view would be that external powered drives are more likely to be treated harshly and go wrong.

The importance of backup does appear to be sinking in, however. A survey of 300 Australian businesses commissioned by Kroll Ontrack found that the majority do have reasonable backup processes in place, with only 11% backing up less frequently than once a week.

Whatever backup medium you prefer, get the process moving efficiently with our best Windows backup tools. If you're looking to populate a spare USB key for a friend or relative, head straight for our guide to the perfect giveaway drive.


Comments

    "Adrian Briscoe, local managing director for Kroll Ontrack, which performs recovery services when drives go bad."

    When Good Drives Go Bad

    Coming soon to Seven. lol

    my question is how do you decide on which external hard drive to get and which features are really necessary?
    for someone who simply wants to get a 1TB drive to use for backing up photos, music, files etc, what features should i consider a bare minimum?

      The reason why Australians are big consumers of external hard drives is no mystery.

      We backup everything because we pay so much for bandwidth - everything we download is valuable and has a real, tangible cost.

      Other countries have the luxury of treating downloaded content as disposable, but not us.

    The thing to remember about External Hard drives is that they all use the same type of drive you would find inside your computer and hence someday will fail also. The trick with external drives is that you can control the period of time they operate and maybe extend the time before they would fail giving you a relatively safer storage space.

      >>The thing to remember about External Hard drives is that they all use the same type of drive you would find inside your computer and hence someday will fail also.>>

      Indeed. Plus a fire or flood could wipe out both your computer and eHD. The answer of, of course, is not to put all your birds in one bush (or whatever the expression is!). Backup to local storage (an ioSafe would be a great choice: www.iosafe.com/3) *and* backup online - or, if you have bandwidth limits, at least get your really, really important stuff online.

    If your looking for a good backup solution that doesn't have to be expensive consider a NAS device for home. You can backup, but also stream video, music (iTunes etc) and a whole host of other things. I'm running a 1TB ReadyNas Duo hooked up to my XBMC, Xbox 360, Wii, Laptops and everything else with a network connection. It works a treat!

    I think he is right. I would prefer a transparent cloud based option but I don't have the bandwidth to make it happen. I think there is a lot of file sharing via USB hd too. No good vod services and we wouldn't have enough bandwidth even if they did exist.

    Bandwidth charges are a joke - how did we ever get to this place.
    But external hard drives are indeed great. Jeez $160 for a brand name package with 1Tb (hint: NOT at HarveyNorman). Sure not the greatest transfer speeds (it is USB2 after-all) but plenty good enough to watch a HD fillum and great for partition images. It doesn't have to last forever coz, well nothing lasts forever!

    I have a couple of external HDD's and yes I use that to back up all that I download, patches, etc... I cannot hold all that on my laptop. I feel that the external hdd's are definitely cheaper than the broadband connection I am paying for. If I had to upload or sync with a cloud, I can forget uploading it in this lifetime, downloading is another lifetime...

    I am on my second Lacie drive and just got that back after it failed (NAS OS on the drive corrupted). I use it regularly as storage, not just backup so it's on often. Now I have to look at genuine backup options such as online, or USB drive that I sync once a week and then store away from home (such as work).

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