Trigger Green Lights with Your Motorcycle, Scooter, or Bicycle

If you've ever sat endlessly at a red light because your motorcycle, scooter, or bicycle doesn't have the conductive juice to trigger the traffic light change, DIY site Instructables suggests that a small magnet attached to the bottom of your vehicle will do the trick every time. If anyone's ever tried this out, let us know how it worked for you in the comments.


Comments

    I'm not sure abut this one. I own a smart car, which is small and plastic. I have never had any issues with traffic lights.

    The trick with a bike is to ride along the long edge of the inductive loop, usually a seen as a rectangle marking in the bitumen. If you ride to far to the lift you miss the sensor and riding through the centre does not cause enough of an effect to register your presence.

    Sometimes this can't be seen in which case ride where the wheels of cars would normally go.

    "I'm not sure abut this one. I own a smart car, which is small and plastic."

    Don't be silly. Your smart car weighs 730 kg and has plastic body panels and metal engine and chassis, my bike weighs 125 kg (250 two stroke) and also has plastic body panels and largely aluminium engine and chassis. Cars are huge. Most intersections are fine, but I've found a few that wouldn't detect me.

    While randomly googling this i came across this response to the same device.

    ""I read your article on triggering traffic signals with a bicycle and would like to tell you a few facts about vehicle detectors as I am a designer of these units. Firstly, magnets have no effect at all on loop detectors (unless of course the magnet is so big that it acts more like a big mass of metal.) If you want to trigger the traffic lights with 100% certainty, simply get off the bike and lay the front wheel of the cycle flat over the loop towards one corner for a second or two. The rim of a cycle wheel acts like a big short circuited turn of wire and used in this way will produce a bigger signal than most automobiles do. The reason for this is that you can place your wheel flat on the ground so that it is about 10 x closer to the loop than most automobiles can reach." -- Graham Lill, Dept. of Infrastructure, Energy, & Resources, Tasmania"

    from here - http://bicycleuniverse.info/transpo/triggering-signals.html

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