How to check that you're enrolled to vote

The pundits are predicting that with the APEC circus behind us, the federal election may be called at any time. Due to recent changes to the electoral laws, the electoral rolls close within a couple of days of the election being called - so now's the time to make sure that your enrolment is up to date. Update: The electoral rolls close when writs are issued, which is between 1-4 days after the election is called by the PM. For new voters and people rejoining the roll after being removed, the deadline to enrol to vote/update their enrolment is 8pm on the day the rolls are closed. There is leeway of up to 3 working days for other people, but it's worth checking the details here:AEC Fact Sheet - Close of Rolls

The Australian Electoral Commmission has a handy online tool to check your enrolment. It's worth checking - I sent in a change of address form a month or so ago, but it seems to have gone missing in the post - and I wouldn't have found out if I hadn't checked online. So if you've moved house since the last election, or you just aren't sure if you are on the electoral roll, it's worth taking a minute to check that you're enrolled at your current address.

Australian Electoral Commission Enrolment Verification


Comments

    Your post is wrong on two accounts.

    1) The rolls do not call when the election is called; the rolls close when the writs are issued, which is typically 2-3 days after the election announcement.

    2) The AEC updates the rolls on a monthly basis; while, of course, it is possible that your application was misplaced, it is more likely that the most recent cycle of updates has not washed through yet.

    To clarify:
    The electoral rolls close when writs are issued, which is between 1-4 days after the election is called by the PM.
    For new voters and people rejoining the roll after being removed, the deadline to enrol to vote/update their enrolment is 8pm on the day the rolls are closed. There is leeway of up to 3 working days for other people, but it's worth checking the details here:

    http://www.aec.gov.au/About_AEC/Publications/Fact_Sheets/Close_of_Rolls.htm

    I've added this comment to the original post too.
    Cheers,

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