Tagged With productivity

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iOS: EasilyDo is a new app that aims to be a central hub for all of those personal things you need to do but would rather have technology do for you. It can clean up your contacts, let you know when to leave for your next appointment, give you directions and dial into conference calls.

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Many of us consider ourselves either a morning person or a night owl — times when we feel more productive, awake and think better. However, not all types of thinking tasks fit in with what we consider the optimal time of day for us. The Creativity Post points out that creativity happens when you least expect it.

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The to-do list is an inescapable, age-old productivity tool. It is our very human attempt to create order in our disorderly lives and an expression of our ability to impose self-control. Most of us, including to-do list haters, keep one, and so do 63 per cent of professionals, according to a LinkedIn survey released earlier this year. And yet to-do lists seem particularly difficult to tame. iDoneThis' Janet Choi explains why to-do lists fail, and how to use it to your advantage.

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Is luck a supernatural thing that we have no control over, represented by four leaf clovers and gold pots at the end of the rainbow? For The Simple Dollar's Trent Hamm, luck is defined as the result of some of the many random events in life bouncing more in your favour than before. Here, he explains how to make "life design" choices that will cause luck to pop up more and more.

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Since launching in June 2011, Fab.com has become the internet's fastest growing e-commerce site. It has captured more than six million users with its yes-you-can-afford-it prices and constantly changing lineup of design products.

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A reader recently asked me a pointed question: "I've read your work on creating user habits. It's all well and good for getting people to do things, like using an app on their iPhone, but I've got a bigger problem. How do I get people to do things they don't want to do?" Taken aback by the directness and potentially immoral implications of his question, my gut reaction was to say "You can't and shouldn't!" To which his response was "I have to; it's my job."

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The team at 99Ufollows productivity trends on a daily basis and noticed that every few years, a research study comes along that fundamentally changes the way we think about work. These studies are often conducted over decades and follow people across their careers to offer the rest of us a template to follow for our day-to-day lives. Below are three studies that are behind much of the productivity and creativity advice you read every day.

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You can focus your time locally or globally. But if you over-commit yourself locally, you under-commit yourself globally and vice-versa. If you're local, then you're probably social, doing a lot of things in-person and being a part of your community. But this means you'll have less time to focus on creating things for the world. If you're global, then you want to focus on creating things that can reach out through distribution to the whole world. But this means you'll have less time to be part of your local community. Neither is right or wrong, but you need to be aware of the choices you're making.

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I recently received an email making a simple request. However, the email was three pages long. The whole message could have been three lines, but instead the author decided to write a short novella. Needless to say, I didn't read the whole thing. Nor did I respond. Are your emails going unread because they are too long?