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How To Reduce The Cost Of A Data Breach In Your Organisation

Recently, I caught up with a friend who works in IT security and the topic of data breaches came up in conversation. He said it used to be hard to convince stakeholders in an organisation about the costs of data breaches; brand damage is difficult to quantify in dollars. But thanks to major data leakage incidents from the likes of Sony and Telstra in recent years, protection of digital information is now being taken seriously. A new report by the Ponemon Institute looks closer at the hard costs associated with data breaches and examines what methods organisations can adopt to reduce that cost. Read on to find out more.


What Is This Differential Privacy Thing Apple Is Talking About (For People Who Hate Maths)?

The term “differential privacy” has popped into public consciousness after Apple announced it was using this mathematical technique to ensure that user information it collects through iOS devices is kept private. It’s a complex statistical science concept that involves large datasets, analytics, adding noise to the data and maths. Maths. And now I have a headache. It’s hard to find a simple way of explaining Apple’s application of differential privacy to people with limited knowledge of mathematics and technology. But it’s something all iOS users should know, especially when it concerns their own data. Here’s our layman’s guide to Apple’s differential privacy.


Apple To iOS App Developers: All Apps Need To Use HTTPS Connection By 2017

Apple introduced its App Transport Security (ATS) standard when it rolled out iOS 9. The ATS restricts apps from transferring data through a HTTP connection, forcing them to go through HTTPS instead. The latter is an encrypted communication protocol, which keeps the data secure. iOS app developers were encouraged to update their apps to accommodate for the new standard. Now Apple is taking a tougher stance, requiring all apps to use the ATS feature by 2017. Here’s what you need to know.


Temporarily Store Your Incognito Browsing History Until You Close Chrome

Chrome: Incognito mode in Chrome is great, but one downside is the fact Chrome doesn’t keep any kind of history when you’re using it. That’s great most of the time, but sometimes you do want that history. Off the Record History creates a temporary history file in incognito mode for just those reasons.


Everything You Need To Do To Secure Your Raspberry Pi Home Automation Projects

When you’re working with connected devices or home automation projects on the Raspberry Pi, it’s important to lock down your Raspberry Pi so it’s secure. Over on Hackster.io, they show you exactly how to that.


How To Defend Your Privacy In The Internet Age

The internet has done a lot to kill privacy. Reverse image searches, check-ins, ubiquitous social networks, data marketplaces, and almost unintelligible privacy settings and policies have removed any anonymity the internet once provided.


Ask LH: Are Homeowners Allowed To Secretly Record Me In Their House?

Dear Lifehacker, I was recently hired to mind a house and some pet birds by a couple who went on holidays. I later discovered I was under active video surveillance for the nine days I spent in their house. (One of the homeowners casually slipped it into conversation during handover.) While I respect their concerns and rights regarding security, I feel this was a continuous breach of my privacy. I was never informed of their intention to monitor me 24/7 and wouldn’t have accepted the job if I’d known. So my question is: were they legally entitled to secretly record me or were they breaking the law?


Format Encrypted Drives As ExFAT To Make Them Play Nice On Windows And Mac

After our Windows encryption showdown, reader Jerod passed along this tip to make sure your encrypted volumes, especially external hard drives, in Windows play nicely with other platforms like OS X — just format them as exFAT, and they will be mountable, readable and writable everywhere you go.


Windows Encryption Showdown: VeraCrypt Vs Bitlocker

When you really need to keep your files safe and secure, you need encryption. We’ve covered the basics before, and even rounded up your favourite encryption tools, but today we’re putting two of the most popular options for Windows head to head to see which one is the best at keeping your sensitive data safe.


Passlok Simplifies Email Encryption So Anyone Can Use It

Web/Chrome/Android/iOS: We’ve shown you how to encrypt your email with PGP, but it can be daunting to get started with. Passlok is a webapp, mobile app and Chrome app that makes the process easy, and there’s a Chrome extension that even integrates with Gmail, Outlook and Yahoo.


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