privacy
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The 2016 Census Will Keep Your Name And Address

Opinion: In case you haven’t heard, this year’s Census will not be anonymous. When you fill out the 2016 Australian Census questionnaire — if you don’t somehow avoid it or refuse to take part — your name and address will be linked for the first time to other, previously anonymised data like your status of employment, education and personal health. The Census on the night of August 9th will be conducted almost entirely online, too — so get used to your personal data being transferred around the ‘net.


Is It Legal For Police To Search Your Phone?

Consider the following scenarios: A police officer stops you on the street and asks you to empty your pockets. A police officer stops you in your car and asks to search you and the vehicle. Regardless of nearly all factors, one of the items recovered will inevitably be a mobile phone. But in what circumstances can police search your phone? Must they obtain a search warrant? And what will happen if you refuse to provide your passcode or fingerprint required to access your phone? Let’s find out.


Be Extra Careful About Identity Theft During A Move

Identity theft rates are on the rise, so you should always be vigilant of the threat, and that means taking the necessary steps to protect yourself. As author Adam Levin points out, you should be especially careful to secure your personal information during a big move.


Microsoft Scores Win Against US Govt's Demands To Access Outlook Emails Hosted Overseas

No, the US Government can’t access emails that are stored overseas even if it’s hosted by an American company. That’s according to a US appeals court ruling in a landmark case that involves one of the biggest technology players in the world, Microsoft. Here are the details.


Pokémon GO Updates With A Fix For Google Permissions

Yesterday, the internet was aflutter with a seeming overreach of Pokémon GO‘s access to your Google account. While that all turned out to be an error that wasn’t as bad as it looked, Niantic’s gone ahead and fixed things to make the whole process much more clear.


How To See Everything Google Knows About You

It’s no secret that Google knows a lot about its users. The tech giant collects tons of data about you, including your search history, location, and voice searches that help improve Google’s services and provide relevant ads. However, you might be surprised to know Google can easily take a look at all of the data it has on you. Here’s how you can find out what the tech giant knows about your online habits and personal information.


How To Make Sure Your VPN Is Honest About Its International Exit Servers

One of the best reasons to use a VPN is to get around pesky location restrictions on streaming movies and other content. But before you shell out money to a VPN that promises servers in dozens of countries, make sure they’re telling the truth about them. Trust, but verify.


How To Reduce The Cost Of A Data Breach In Your Organisation

Recently, I caught up with a friend who works in IT security and the topic of data breaches came up in conversation. He said it used to be hard to convince stakeholders in an organisation about the costs of data breaches; brand damage is difficult to quantify in dollars. But thanks to major data leakage incidents from the likes of Sony and Telstra in recent years, protection of digital information is now being taken seriously. A new report by the Ponemon Institute looks closer at the hard costs associated with data breaches and examines what methods organisations can adopt to reduce that cost. Read on to find out more.


What Is This Differential Privacy Thing Apple Is Talking About (For People Who Hate Maths)?

The term “differential privacy” has popped into public consciousness after Apple announced it was using this mathematical technique to ensure that user information it collects through iOS devices is kept private. It’s a complex statistical science concept that involves large datasets, analytics, adding noise to the data and maths. Maths. And now I have a headache. It’s hard to find a simple way of explaining Apple’s application of differential privacy to people with limited knowledge of mathematics and technology. But it’s something all iOS users should know, especially when it concerns their own data. Here’s our layman’s guide to Apple’s differential privacy.


Apple To iOS App Developers: All Apps Need To Use HTTPS Connection By 2017

Apple introduced its App Transport Security (ATS) standard when it rolled out iOS 9. The ATS restricts apps from transferring data through a HTTP connection, forcing them to go through HTTPS instead. The latter is an encrypted communication protocol, which keeps the data secure. iOS app developers were encouraged to update their apps to accommodate for the new standard. Now Apple is taking a tougher stance, requiring all apps to use the ATS feature by 2017. Here’s what you need to know.


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