Tagged With linux.conf.au

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A belated closing note to our Linux week coverage: Linux.conf.au 2012 will be held in Ballarat, marking the first regional city to host the event. We had a great time in Brisbane (and still have a few more posts to write covering the last day of the conference), and trust that Ballarat will be just as useful and informative.

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The point in a job interview where the tables are turned and you are asked if you have any questions can sometimes be challenging. If the person interviewing you is also likely to be your boss if you get the job, one good thing to ask is how they keep track of the projects they're responsible for managing.

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One of the much-discussed advantages of open source software is that it should make it easier for future generations to access data. But in his keynote address at Linux.conf.au in Brisbane, "father of the Internet" Vint Cerf noted that even open source systems weren't completely free from the challenge of data being created that might not be accessible to future software, a problem he refers to as "bit rot".

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As the slide above illustrates, organisers for Linux.conf.au 2011 had to work through a pretty extensive to-do list when the Queensland floods meant that the original venue was no longer available. In just 10 days, they managed to relocate the whole conference and associated events. Their experience reinforces two crucial points: the importance of having back-up plans, and the importance of being willing to change almost anything at the last minute.

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Its planned Brisbane riverside location at the QUT Garden Point campus meant that plans for Linux.conf.au were in a state of flux after last week's floods. However, organisers have confirmed that the event will still go ahead, with backup plans for accommodation and conference venues in place pending a final assessment on Wednesday evening. Wherever it happens, Lifehacker will be there, and is looking forward to it!

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Linux.conf.au is an entirely organised and run by volunteers, and still keeps to schedule better than most paid conferences I attend. The call has gone out for Brisbane geeks to assist at the 2011 event in January. If you're keen to help further the cause of open source software, hit the link for more details.

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We've known since January that Linux.conf.au 2011 would be in Brisbane, and now registration for Australia's key Linux event has opened up. Early bird rates apply until November 8 for the conference, which takes place from January 24-29. As usual, Lifehacker will be attending, and we heartily recommend the event for Linux and open source enthusiasts.

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The closing ceremony for Linux.conf.au always features an announcement of the venue for the following year. The 2010 conference in Wellington has gone off well, but Australians won't need to travel quite so far for the 2011 event, which will take place in Brisbane. No fixed dates, but early February at QUT looks likely.

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It's no surprise that when Google decided to host a "miniconf" about Google Wave at linux.conf.au, company staff encouraged the use of Wave itself to take notes on the sessions. But while there's a lot to recommend Wave for this process, there's one big reason why it's not yet up to the task.