Tagged With interviews

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Hi Lifehacker, I was asked for salary expectations in an interview for a contract IT job. I left it to the employer to decide what they could offer me, but they persuaded me to provide a range. I didn't have the exact salary figure from my last job, so I quoted bit lower range. Now I've got the job offer and have accepted the job. I've been sent the paperwork to complete. I have just come across salary figures from my last job. There's quite considerable difference in my salary. I am being offered about $6 K less. Is it recommended to amend my salary expectations? If so how should I approach them?

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By this point, you know not to apply to any jobs with an email address that screams, "I created this in the eighth grade!" So, you're no longer [email protected] as far as your prospective employers are concerned. You also know not to show up late for the interview. And you have a firm grasp on the importance of making eye contact and delivering a solid handshake.

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Often, the best way to approach self-improvement is to look to those you admire and seek out advice. That's why we regularly feature interesting and accomplished people to share their favourite work habits, tools, and tips for staying productive. Here are our most popular interviews of 2016.

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Preparing for interviews is serious business. But even if you practise, and practise, and practise, you could still get a question you just don't know how to answer. Whether it's a technical question on something you've never heard of before or just something completely unexpected, a question that stumps you can really throw off the pacing of the conversation and leave you a bit shaken up.

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I have vivid memories from my hiring days of going through applications for various roles and finding that one person who decided to submit an application for every single one. It happened more than you'd think — and honestly, it happened more than even I anticipated when I was new to recruiting. However, as I started reviewing more and more resumes, one thing became apparent: Somewhere out there is a person who is apparently telling people that the best way to get an employer's attention is to apply for as many of their openings as humanly possible.

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Congratulations! Your carefully crafted cover letter has managed to impress, your CV has demonstrated that you have relevant skills and experience, and you've been invited to an interview with your prospective employer in two days' time. While you've already thought about whether you might be a good fit when you applied for the role, now is the time to reassess the reasons why you want the role and take the time to thoroughly prepare your case.

Unfortunately life doesn't stop when you're preparing for an interview. In the midst of a hectic schedule, what are the three most important things you need to do when preparing for that crucial discussion, within only a short window of time? Read on to find out.

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Every part of the interview process can feel tenuous. Here are a few thoughts I've had during interviews which I'm willing to bet have crossed your mind at some point, too: If I wear the wrong outfit to the first interview, I'll get made fun of relentlessly. If I say something stupid during my final interview, the jig will be up — and nobody will ever hire me. And if my references don't come through with glowing reviews, all the hard work I've done to get to this stage will be wasted.

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You know you're nearing the final stretch of an interview process (and that it's looking good for you) when a potential employer asks for references. If you're not prepared, though, you might be left scrambling at the last minute to find a good reference. Who do you ask and what's the best way to reach out?