gtd

Productivity 101: A Primer To The Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro Technique can help you power through distractions and get things done in short bursts. If you have a job that expects you to meet deadlines, it’s a great way to get through your tasks. Let’s break it down and see how you can apply it to your work.


Set A Procrastination-Free Block To Get Important Tasks Done

Force yourself not to procrastinate and you’ll get more done. It sounds obvious and overly simplistic, but Leo Babauta at Zen Habits says it’s an approach that could help to wave goodbye to “that serpented bringer of apprehension!”


Prioritise Your Time With The Mayonnaise Jar And Two Beers Method

Whenever it feels like you don’t have enough time (perhaps to do all the nothing you want), think of a mayonnaise jar and beer. In this time management fable, a professor fills an empty mayonnaise jar with golf balls and asks his students if the jar is full, to which they say yes.


Get Both A Focused And Bird's Eye View Of Your Tasks With Trello

Trello is a fun tool for collaborative project management, but you can also use it to get personal tasks done. Google Insights Lead Gautam Ramdurai describes how he’s using Trello to get into the “productivity Goldilocks zone”.


Why Your Brain Needs Its Own 'Inbox Zero'

Most of us are familiar with the concept of “inbox zero”, the state (and long-term goal) of having and keeping an empty inbox. Productivity blog Johnny Moneyseed explains why it’s even more important to apply this concept to your mind.


Productivity 101: A Primer To The Getting Things Done (GTD) Philosophy

Getting Things Done, or GTD, is a system for getting organised and staying productive. It may seem complicated on the outside, but the end goal is to spend less time doing the things you have to do so you have more time for the things you want to do. Let’s break it down and see how you can apply a simplified version to your life.


Make A Mind Map To Keep On Top Of Everything In Your Life

Mind maps are wonderful tools for organising information and boosting creativity. GTD guru David Allen says that he now maps out his “world” because his lists of projects and actions alone didn’t keep him as much on top of everything as he needed.


Use The Two-Minute Rule To Stop Procrastinating And Get Things Done

The two-minute rule has its roots in GTD: If you can do it in less than two minutes, do it now (assuming you have no other, bigger priorities at the moment.) Over at the Buffer blog, James Clear adds another rule: When you start a new habit, divide your goals into two-minute bites so they’re easy to do at any time.


This GTD Workflow Is How I Finally Got My Email Inbox Under Control

I have a confession to make: I hate emails. So much so that they just pile up, sometimes burying ones that are actually important. That all changed this weekend when I copied this GTD Gmail setup from startup founder Andreas Klinger.


The History Of The To-Do List (And How To Make Yours More Effective)

When I was a kid, I read a book called The Listmaker. It’s about a young girl who uses lists to organise and make sense of her life. At the time, I didn’t read any more into it besides the fact that this was an odd hobby for a pre-teen girl to spend so much time on. Now, although I don’t remember the book that well, I do see much more significance in the humble list — especially after researching where they come from and why we make lists.