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Ask LH: Am I Allowed To Scrape Designs From A Company I Used To Work For?

Dear Lifehacker, In my previous job I developed some Intellectual Property in the form of an online fitness challenge. I’m pretty proud of the work and wanted to get access to the files again. However I’m worried that I might be violating the code of conduct by trying to regain access to the material.


We All Know Movie Piracy Is Wrong. So Why Do We Do It?

Beginning about 20 years ago, the internet placed almost the entirety of human creation in an unguarded window display and said, in effect, help yourself. The public, presented with an amazing smorgasboard of content, plunged right in. This eventually came to include nearly every movie and TV show in existence.


Ask LH: Does Projecting Movies In My Backyard Count As A Public Screening?

Dear LH, I’m planning to set up an outdoor cinema in my backyard next summer. This is only for personal use with friends and family, but I read somewhere that you’re not allowed to publicly screen movies without permission from the copyright holder. Is this something I should be worried about? Or is it just a case of possibly annoying the neighbours who will be able to hear it?


The Dallas Buyers Club Court Decision Is Good News For Pirates - Here's Why

The makers of the Matthew McConaughey-starring movie Dallas Buyers Club have been dealt a blow in their attempt to extract payment from people alleged to have downloaded illegal copies in Australia. So what happens now?


Is It Legal To Make And Share GIFs?

UFC Women’s Bantamweight champion Ronda ‘Rowdy’ Rousey‘s last fight ended in 34 seconds. The two before that ended in 16 seconds and 14 seconds respectively, one by knock out and the other by submission. The brevity and ‘wow’ factor of those bouts made them the perfect ingredients for animated GIFs which then spread across the internet through social media and image sharing websites like Imgur and Tumblr. But is it legal to create and share these seemingly harmless GIFs?


Format Shifting In Australia: What Can You Legally Do With 'Your' Content?

In the UK, it’s just become illegal to rip CDs you own, but that doesn’t mean the same law applies here. Still, it’s worthwhile refreshing what’s legal under Australian copyright law and what isn’t.


Ask LH: Can I Be Sued For Using A Copyrighted Photo On My Blog?

Hey LH, I recently received what could be described as an extortion letter from Dun & Bradstreet on behalf of Getty Images. I work in a school where we have a website dedicated to providing newsletter content to our parents. In one edition of the newsletter, I used a generic image that is apparently rights managed by Getty. I’ve since been asked for an outrageous $915 fee for using a 400px image.


Australian 'Three Strikes' Anti-Piracy Code: What You Need To Know

The final version of the proposed “three strikes” anti-piracy code for Australian internet service providers (ISPs) has just been published. Assuming this is approved by the regulator, there will soon be new rules that allow movie and TV studios to seek details of alleged downloaders after they have been sent three warnings.


How Australian ISPs Will Start Busting Users For Piracy

Australia is now a lot closer to having a US-style system where your internet service provider (ISP) would be required to send notices if you’re suspected of torrenting movies, TV shows and other copyright material. A new draft code developed by ISPs outlines how that “three strikes” process will work.


Why Forcing ISPs To Follow A Code Won't Stop Illegal Downloads

Attorney-General George Brandis and Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced yesterday that they expect internet service providers (ISPs) to work with copyright owners to help police infringement.


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