Tagged With broadband

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TPG currently stands as the second largest internet service provider (ISP) in Australia and is a force to be reckoned with in the telecommunications industry. Its rapid growth is mainly attributed to strategic acquisitions it has made in recent years. One of those acquisitions was iiNet, an ISP that boasted high customer satisfaction rates and was well-respected in the telco community.

It has been over a year since TPG bought iiNet and the situation looks bleak for the ISP that was once the darling of the telco industry. Most recently, iiNet's Sydney office was shut down and most of the staff were made redundant. We spoke to one former iiNet employee to get the insider story on the aftermath of the TPG acquisition. We also spoke with iiNet to get its side of the story.

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As the copper phone network goes from bad to worse, decent broadband is still years away for many Australians. If your phone line is slowly failing but the NBN is still years from your street, what's your fallback broadband plan? As I personally discovered, the available options aren't great...

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The NBN's Goldilocks technology of fibre to the distribution point (FttDP) — sitting just right in between the convenience of fibre to the node (FttN) and the speed of fibre to the premises (FttP) — is a step closer to becoming a reality in Australia. NBN calls the tech 'fibre to the curb' (FttC) for some unknown reason, rather than FttDP or fibre to the driveway, but it's earmarked Australia's own Netcomm Wireless as the supplier of tech for the future network build-out.

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Internet service provider MyRepublic thinks it's rubbish that a lot of Australians on the National Broadband Network (NBN) are getting ADSL speeds. The company has announced its entering the local market with a 'true' NBN offer that gives customers up to 100Mbps download speeds with no data limits for a flat rate of $59.95 per month. Here's what you need to know.

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If the only reason you have a landline telephone is the internet, you might want to consider naked DSL. After all, why pay for a service you never use? To help you save money, we've gathered the ten cheapest offerings in this category so you can finally put the "house phone" out of its misery.

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Australians have one of the lowest broadband satisfaction ratings in the world, with a new Ipsos poll ranking us 23rd out of 26 countries. South Korea, with its average peak connection speed of 95.3Mbps, topped the list. (Well, duh.) The NBN clearly isn't doing its job.

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Nokia Bell Labs, Deutsche Telekom T-Labs and the Technical University of Munich have made some important strides towards extremely fast internet connections. The team says they have achieved "unprecedented transmission capacity", at a rate of one terabit-per-second.

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Australia's National Broadband Network (NBN) currently provides five wholesale access speeds known as "tiers". The highest tier (Tier 5) provides download speeds of up to 100 Mbps, while the lowest tier (Tier 1) barely rivals traditional ADSL2+. But how do they compare on price? Let's find out...

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The Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) says that information about broadband speeds isn’t being communicated to consumers in a clear and upfront way.

ACCAN’s submission to the ACCC’s consultation on broadband speed highlights that information provided to consumers about broadband speeds is often confusing and can also be misleading as claimed speeds frequently don’t match reality.

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nbn has released its Corporate Plan for 2017-2010. If the government-owned corporation can be believed, the national broadband network is on track to connect 8 million active end users by 2020. But how many of these will be fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) compared to fibre-to-the-node (FTTN), hybrid fibre co-axial (HFC) and fixed wireless/satellite? This chart breaks down the numbers, along with how much each technology actually costs.

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The NBN might not be available everywhere, but if you live in the heart of a major Australian city you're pretty spoiled for choice. Deciding which plan to sign up for can therefore be a bit daunting. If you require lots of data at the cheapest possible price, this roundup of unlimited NBN plans will help to narrow down your selection.

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Ethernet cables are the lifeblood of any wired internet network. While they all look very similar on the outside, these cables can potentially affect the speed of your home network depending on which type you're using. This infographic breaks down the key differences between Cat5, Cat5e and Cat6 ethernet cables, including how much you can expect to pay for them in Australia.

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Dear Lifehacker, To what extent does a "slow" internet connection affect operating system and application response times? My work connection is much faster than my home connection, and it often feels like the same machine is slower at home. I suspect that operating systems and applications often "phone home" and that waiting for responses over slow links slows things down. Does this actually happen?

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It is not too late to change the current direction of Australia's NBN from one that just meets today's demands, to one that we need for the future. Former NBN boss Mike Quigley explains what's wrong with the current model and why we need to change it...

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Telstra has the fastest mobile data network in Australia but the once-ridiculed Vodafone now matches the dominant telco for high-speed 4G coverage. That's according to a new report by wireless mapping company OpenSignal, which compared the performance of Australia's three largest telcos based on 15 million data samples crowdsourced from 7904 users.

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As hinted in earlier announcements by Shadow Communications Minister, Jason Clare, Labor’s much-anticipated policy for the National Broadband Network released Monday commits the party – if elected – to move away from the Coalition’s fibre to the node (FTTN) network and transition back to a roll-out of fibre to the premises (FTTP). This was the central pillar of Labor’s original NBN. So how does this compare with the Coalition's version of the NBN? Let's have a look.

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The National Broadband Network (NBN) has been a sore spot for the Federal Government. The Coalition swooped into power in 2013 and wasted no time in dumping Labor's much-loved fibre-to-the-premise (FTTP) broadband plans in favour of the cheaper and slower alternative: fibre-to-the-node (FTTN). Worst. Idea. Ever. With an upcoming election, the Opposition has promised to bring back a FTTP NBN. If you don't want to read the 33-page document that Labor released (which is mostly full of political rhetoric) here's a summary of the main points and we take a closer look at some of the details.

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"There has not been a delay of the NBN… Because of Malcolm Turnbull’s management of the NBN, it will all be finished by 2020, not 2024 as Labor was promising, with speeds that people want and need."

These are the words of Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science Christopher Pyne during this week's episode of Q&A on the ABC. Was Christopher Pyne right to say there has been no delay? We take a look at the facts...