Money

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Hump day (AKA Wednesday) is arguably the most boring day of the week. So why not liven things up by grabbing one of these nifty online bargains? Deals that caught our eye this week include: get 20% off select products at eBay, Back To School deals from Officeworks and Microsoft, get six months of free Netflix via Telstra TV.

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If TV manufacturers can be believed, curved panels are capable of drawing the viewer into the image in a way flatscreens don't. While once exclusive to cashed up videophiles, the technology is finally becoming affordable to mainstream consumers. At the introductory price of $749, the Kogan 55" 4K Curved LED TV is the cheapest we've seen by a huge margin. Let's take a look at the specs.

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I have a little note that I continuously update and save (using Evernote) that's full of little tips and strategies that I learn about or think about and want to include in a post at some point. Eventually, I wind up with a big collection of them. Here are eight of those ideas, little strategies for shopping so that you'll spend less money and wind up with fewer things that you don't really need.

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Welcome to the second annual Lifehacker Ultimate Money Challenge. After considering your feedback, we've decided to once again challenge you throughout the year with a new financial goal every month. This month's? The 30-Day Savings Challenge.

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As adults, we've had a lifetime to learn how to manage our money and spend smart — but are we teaching our kids how to do the same? Finance may seem like a grown-up concept, but it's never too early to start teaching your children about managing money.

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More than 20,000 shoppers complained to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission about consumer guarantees in 2016, with more than a quarter reporting problems returning electronics and whitegoods to retailers.

As the Christmas period ends and Boxing Day sales wind down, the ACCC is reminding shoppers they have automatic guarantee rights that a product will work for a reasonable period of time under the Australian Consumer Law.

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Making New Year's resolutions is tricky in the first place. Do you start out small with something you know you can achieve consistently without really pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, or do you go all out and hope that willpower alone will drag you through? In other words, do you make a resolution to catch the train to work a little more instead of driving, or do you make a resolution to take a holiday every month and pack on 20 kilos of muscle at the gym before the next year is out?