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Briefly: Game of Thrones Meets Amazon, goCatch Two-Up Discount

Brief news items of note for Lifehacker readers, including Amazon Prime’s HBO shenanigans and a goCatch ANZAC discount.


Microsoft Forefront Is Getting A New Name

Last December, Microsoft said that the next version of its Forefront enterprise security products would be released in early 2015. There’s now a more detailed roadmap for how that will happen, and a name change is in the offing.


Five New Ways To Improve Your Life

Improving your life isn’t always a matter of making big complex changes: often it’s the small incremental steps that add up. Here are five new techniques that you can apply to make life better.


Google Street View Now Lets You Browse Older Images

Normally when you use Google Street View, you’ll see the most recent available image captured by the Google Street View cameras. Google has now added an option where you can see older Street View imagery, dating back as far as 2007, in some locations.


What IT Pros Get Wrong On Their Resumes

Even if you’re invited to apply for a role rather than hunting it down, you’ll need to submit a resume as part of the process. Our sibling publication Business Insider has rounded up ten of the most common mistakes techies make when compiling a resume.


Briefly: Video Game Movies, The Lower-Fibre NBN

Brief news items of note for Lifehacker readers, including overdosing on video game movies, more changes at NBN Co, and why cinema tickets are so expensive.


Last Week's 10 Biggest Posts

You wanted Easter eggs, sweet dreams, unlimited NBN and better Wi-Fi. Kick off your Monday by checking out the ten most popular posts from Lifehacker Australia last week:


Cloud Patches: AWS & Heartbleed, Azure Goes Multi-Forest

Last week in cloud computing: how Amazon Web Services (AWS) dealt with Heartbleed, and how Azure is extending its directory capabilities.



CAPTCHA Can Now Be Decoded By Computers

CAPTCHA is evil and must be stopped. This much we know. Here’s another nail in the coffin of the universally-loathed authentication system: it turns out that despite being designed to stop automated processes, CAPTCHAs can actually be easily cracked with the right kind of computing power.