Twitter Hacked And 250,000 User Accounts Potentially Compromised: Change Your Passwords

In a blog post today, Twitter has let users know that around 250,000 user's accounts have potentially been compromised.

Twitter found unusual access patterns on some accounts. Subsequently, they've revoked access to all compromised accounts, and you should receive an email requiring you to reset your password if yours is one of them. That said, if you're worried about your account, now's as good a time as any to change your password for Twitter (and any other account with the same email and password combination). Here's a quick primer for getting started with our favourite password manager, LastPass:

  • If you're brand new to LastPass, head over to our beginner's guide to LastPass to get up and running.
  • If you're already using LastPass, our intermediate guide will help you go beyond the basics.
  • Of particular interest right now, you can use LastPass to audit and update your passwords. Their audit tool can reveal your least secure passwords, which passwords you're repeating on various sites (fixing this for a password you may have repeated on Zappos will be especially important), and more.

Using a tool like LastPass may seem like overkill, but remember: The only secure password is the one you can't remember. You're better safe than sorry.

Keeping our users secure [Twitter via All Things D]


Comments

    +1 for lastpass. If you're not using a password manager you chould really try one. It's become one of the most important/useful things I have.

      ■Of particular interest right now, you can use LastPass to audit and update your passwords.
      As the passwords were "compromised" at Twitter it is quite irrelevant whether you are a user of LastPass or not. Even though only 250,000 of the 140 million users are affected, it certainly wouldn't hurt to change your password and keep it secure with LastPass.

    I learnt a couple of days ago that my twitter account had been hacked. A colleague a work said to me "what's this tweet you sent?", I was quite bemused as although I created a twitter accounts a while back I don't actually use it.

    So I logged into my account to find that I had apparently been tweeting every couple of days for quite a while, the content of which was usually some statement about making money easy and a link to follow.

    Needless to say I promptly changed my password. I then deleted my account completely because Twitter sucks.

      "Needless to say I promptly changed my password. I then deleted my account completely because Twitter sucks."

      Then why change the password first?

        Because although I've deleted my account, it's no doubt more of an inactivation. Meaning that my details would remain on a server in a database somewhere in case I decide to reactivate the account one day. Since that password is already compromised I figured it was best to update it first, then let the un-hacked account details remain dormant.

      Mine was hacked as well, random posts about making money which redirected to a Russian Facebook page. Changed my password straight away, yet never received a email from Twitter?

        I never received anything from Twitter either.

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